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Implication of the Cytochrome b Mutations in the Evolution of Breast Benign Tumors Among Senegalese Women
International Journal of Genetics and Genomics
Volume 3, Issue 4, August 2015, Pages: 36-42
Received: Jul. 15, 2015; Accepted: Jul. 23, 2015; Published: Aug. 1, 2015
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Authors
Daniel Doupa, Department of Biology Animal, Faculty of Science and Technology, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal
Jean Luc Faye, Department of Biology Animal, Faculty of Science and Technology, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal
Fatimata Mbaye, Department of Biology Animal, Faculty of Science and Technology, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal; Sudanian Sahel Animal Populations Biology (BIOPASS), Research Institute for Development, IRD / Bel-Air, Senegal
Sidy Ka, Cancer Institut, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal
Ahmadou Dem, Cancer Institut, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal
Mamadou Kane, Sudanian Sahel Animal Populations Biology (BIOPASS), Research Institute for Development, IRD / Bel-Air, Senegal
Mbacké Sembène, Department of Biology Animal, Faculty of Science and Technology, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal; Sudanian Sahel Animal Populations Biology (BIOPASS), Research Institute for Development, IRD / Bel-Air, Senegal
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Abstract
While the studies linking the germ line mtDNA mutations to cancer raise many ambiguities because of its high genetic variability, the study of somatic mutations of this one, is proved to be decisive in the identifying of mutations involved in the genesis and evolution of tumors. In the present study, we determined the implication of the Cytochrome b mutations in the evolution of breast benign tumors among Senegalese women. This one is about, with the sequencing-PCR, to research mutations of Cytochrome b, to evaluate their importance among a benign tissues group compared to another healthy tissues group; and thence, to determine the effect of the natural selection on the observed variability. The analysis of mutations profiles of Cytochrome b in benign tissues allowed seeing that 50% of them have led to a change in amino acid and 12.5% to a shift in the reading frame. Moreover, the analysis of selection signature indicated that these mutations were subjected to a positive selection. The results also revealed that the population of benign cells was growing rapidly from an ancestral population sparse. These observations have enabled to accept the hypothesis that Cytochrome b mutations would be involved in the evolution of breast benign tumors among Senegalese women.
Keywords
Breast, Benign, Tumors, Cytochrome b, Variability, Evolution, Senegal
To cite this article
Daniel Doupa, Jean Luc Faye, Fatimata Mbaye, Sidy Ka, Ahmadou Dem, Mamadou Kane, Mbacké Sembène, Implication of the Cytochrome b Mutations in the Evolution of Breast Benign Tumors Among Senegalese Women, International Journal of Genetics and Genomics. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 36-42. doi: 10.11648/j.ijgg.20150304.11
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