Changes in Vitamin D are Not Associated with Changes in Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Clinical Medicine Research
Volume 2, Issue 4, July 2013, Pages: 68-72
Received: Jun. 18, 2013; Published: Jul. 10, 2013
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Authors
Sara M. Gregory, Division of Cardiology, Henry Low Heart Center, Hartford, CT, USA
Beth A. Parker, Division of Cardiology, Henry Low Heart Center, Hartford, CT, USA
Jeffrey A. Capizzi, Division of Cardiology, Henry Low Heart Center, Hartford, CT, USA
Adam S. Grimaldi, Division of Cardiology, Henry Low Heart Center, Hartford, CT, USA
Priscilla M. Clarkson, School of Public Health & HealthSciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
Stephanie Moeckel-Cole, School of Public Health & HealthSciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
Justin Keadle, School of Public Health & HealthSciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
Stuart Chipkin, School of Public Health & HealthSciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
Linda S. Pescatello, NeagSchool of Education, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Kathleen Simpson, NeagSchool of Education, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
C. Michael White, NeagSchool of Education, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Paul D. Thompson, Division of Cardiology, Henry Low Heart Center, Hartford, CT, USA
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Abstract
We investigated the relationship between changes in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and changes in aerobic fitness (VO2max)over 6 months in healthy adults (n = 213, mean ± SD age 44.8 ±16.4 yr, range 20-76 yr, 109 women). 25OHD status was defined as deficient (DEF: 25OHD <50 nmol•L-1, n = 16), insufficient (INS: 25OHD > 50 nmol•L-1 but < 75 nmol•L-1, n = 57), and sufficient (SUF: 25OHD >75 nmol•L-1, n = 140). Tertiles for 25OHD change were computed (lowest: < -17.5 nmol•L-1, n = 67; middle: -17.5 to 9.1 nmol•L-1, n = 75; highest: > 9.1 nmol•L-1, n = 71). Baseline 25OHD level (β = -0.003; p = 0.83) and change in 25OHD level (β = 0.01; p = 0.50) were not significant predictors of changes in VO2max. Changes in VO2maxwere similar between 25OHD status groups (p = 0.55; DEF = -1.7 ± 2.1, INS = -0.4 ± 3.2; SUF = -0.3 ± 3.1 ml•kg-1•min-1), and 25OHD change tertiles (p = 0.28; lowest = -0.3 ± 2.7, middle = -0.8 ± 3.5, highest = -0.3 ± 2.9 ml•kg-1•min-1). Changes in vitamin D over a 6-month period were not associated with changes in aerobic fitness. Aerobic fitnessis not impacted by temporal variations in 25OHD.
Keywords
Maximal Oxygen Consumption, 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Aerobic Fitness, Physical Performance
To cite this article
Sara M. Gregory, Beth A. Parker, Jeffrey A. Capizzi, Adam S. Grimaldi, Priscilla M. Clarkson, Stephanie Moeckel-Cole, Justin Keadle, Stuart Chipkin, Linda S. Pescatello, Kathleen Simpson, C. Michael White, Paul D. Thompson, Changes in Vitamin D are Not Associated with Changes in Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2013, pp. 68-72. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20130204.16
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