Exclusive Breastfeeding and Maternal Employment in Ethiopia: A Comparative Cross- Sectional Study
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2014, Pages: 497-503
Received: Oct. 4, 2014; Accepted: Oct. 16, 2014; Published: Oct. 30, 2014
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Authors
Mekuanint Taddele, Ahmara Region Health Bureau, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
Lakew Abebe, Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Netsanet Fentahun, Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Back-ground: Promotion of exclusive breastfeeding is the single most cost-effective intervention to reduce infant mortality in developing countries. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months has greater benefit than formula feeding for the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. In Ethiopia, the prevalence of exclusive breast feeding among infants less than 6 months is 49%, with limited information on associated factors of exclusive breast feeding. Understanding the associated factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding is crucial to promote the practice in Ethiopia. Objective: To compare exclusive breastfeeding and its associated factors among employed and unemployed mothers in Injibara Town, Awi Zone, North west Ethiopia. Method: A community-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted from March 24-April 14, 2013. A total of 524 mothers of children age ≤1 year were included in the study. A structured, pretested and self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Descriptive statistics were performed to compare exclusive breastfeeding among employed and unemployed mothers. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify independent predictors of exclusive breastfeeding. Results: The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding was 44% and 65% among employed and unemployed mothers respectively. Employed mothers were 32% times less likely to breast feed exclusively than the unemployed mothers (OR= 0.32). Place of birth (OR=4.4), belief of breast milk sufficiency (OR= 3.6), religious fathers support of exclusive breastfeeding (OR=2.7) and maternal age of 18-23(OR=9.4) were independently predictors of exclusive breastfeeding among employed mothers. Whereas, husbands’ support of exclusive breastfeeding (OR=1.9), knowledge on duration of exclusive breastfeeding (OR=2.8), timely initiation of breastfeeding (OR=2.9), Awareness of exclusive breastfeeding (OR=2.2) and delivery attendance (OR=2.2) were independently predictors of exclusive breastfeeding among unemployed mothers. Conclusions: A large proportion of infants are not exclusively breastfed. Exclusive breastfeeding status of unemployed mothers was significantly better than that of employed mothers. Therefore, the government should promote exclusive breastfeeding by creating breastfeeding friendly working environment.
Keywords
Exclusive Breast Feeding, Maternal Employment, Injibara Town
To cite this article
Mekuanint Taddele, Lakew Abebe, Netsanet Fentahun, Exclusive Breastfeeding and Maternal Employment in Ethiopia: A Comparative Cross- Sectional Study, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2014, pp. 497-503. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140306.12
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