Nutritional Status and Associated Risk Factors Among Adolescents Girls in Agarfa High School, Bale Zone, Oromia Region, South East Ethiopia
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 4, July 2015, Pages: 445-452
Received: Apr. 28, 2015; Accepted: May 25, 2015; Published: Jun. 19, 2015
Views 4802      Downloads 262
Authors
Ahmed Yasin Mohammed, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, Madawalabu University, Bale Goba, Ethiopia
Tomas Benti Tefera, Department of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Science, Madawalabu University, Bale Goba, Ethiopia
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Adolescent have typically been considered as low risk for poor health and often receive few health care resource and attention. However, their approach ignores the fact that many health problems later in life can be improved by adopting health life style habits in adolescents. There is a shortage of studies about nutritional status and associated factors among adolescent girls. The objective of this study was to asses nutritional status of adolescent girls and associated factors in Agarfa high school, Bale zone, Oromia Region, south Eastern Ethiopia. Institutional based cross sectional study was conducted to assess nutritional status of and associated factors in adolescent. The sample size was calculated based on the single proportion formula using the prevalence of malnutrition in adolescents 27%, α=5% and degree of margin of error 5%. The final sample size was 212 adolescent girls. The study employed systematic sampling technique to select adolescents and the data were collected by using structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics was used for reporting the different characteristics while chi square test will be employed to determine factors associated with nutritional status. In this study it can be concluded that the prevalence of underweight and overweight is high. This indicates the double burden of malnutrition among adolescent girls in this area. Dietary factors such as meal frequency, meal skipping and dietary diversity were the associated factor for nutritional status of adolescent girls. Appropriate nutrition education intervention should designed to improve the nutritional status of adolescents girls.
Keywords
Nutritional Status, Risk Factors, Adolescents Girls
To cite this article
Ahmed Yasin Mohammed, Tomas Benti Tefera, Nutritional Status and Associated Risk Factors Among Adolescents Girls in Agarfa High School, Bale Zone, Oromia Region, South East Ethiopia, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2015, pp. 445-452. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20150404.15
References
[1]
Kleigman, B., Jenson,Staton (2004). Nelson Text Book of Pediatrics.
[2]
Agarwal KN, Tripathi AM, Sen S Kaliyar GP (1999). Physical growth and adolescence. Ind. Paediatr. 11, 93– 97.
[3]
Giuseppina D (2000). Nutrition in Adolescence. Pediatrics in Review. 21(1),32-33.
[4]
Kanade AM, Joshi SB, Rao S (1999). Undernutrition and adolescent growth among rural Indian boys. Indian Pediatrics, 36,145-156.
[5]
Singh N, Mishra CP (2001). Nutritional status of adolescent girls of a slum community of Varanarsi. Indian J. Public Health, 45,128-134.
[6]
World Bank (2006). Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development: A Strategy for Large-Scale Action. Washington: The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank.
[7]
Alam N., et al.( 2010). Nutritional Status, Dietary Intake, and Relevant Knowledge of Adolescent Girls in Rural Bangladesh. Journal of Health Population Nutrition, 28(1), 86-94.
[8]
Mulugeta A. et al. (2009).nutritional status of adolecent girls from communities of Tigray, northern Ethiopia. Ethiopian journal of health development.23(1),5-11.
[9]
Venkaiah K, Damayanti K, Nayak MU, Vijayaraghavan K (2002). Diet and nutritional status of rural adolescents in India. Eu. J.Clin. Nutr.,56,1119-1125.
[10]
Woodruff BA, Duffield A (2002). Anthropometric assessment of nutritional status in adolescent population in humanitarian emergencies. Eu J Clin Nutr, 56,1108-1118.
[11]
Brabin L, Brabin BJ (1992). The cost of successful adolescent growth and development in girls in relation to in relation to iron and vitamin A status. Am J Clin Nutr,55,955-958.
[12]
Steketee RW (2003). Pregnancy, Nutrition and Parasitic Diseases. J. Nutr; 133:1661S-1667S.
[13]
WHO, Expert Committee Endorsed The Use Of BMI For Assessing Thinness In Adolescent. 2006.
[14]
Woodruff BA, Duffield A (2002). Anthropometric assessment of nutritional status in adolescent population in humanitarian emergencies. Eu J Clin Nutr,56,1108-1118.
[15]
Leenstra T, Petersen LT, Kariuki SK, Oloo AJ, Kager PA, Kuile FO (2005). Prevalence and severity of malnutrition and age at menarche; cross sectional studies in adolescent schoolgirls in western Kenya. Eur J Clin Nutr,59,41-48.
[16]
Mulugeta A., et al., (2009). Nutritional Status of Adolescent Girls from Rural Communities of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia .Ethiopian Journal of health developmemt. 23(1), 5-11.
[17]
WHO (2006). Adolescent Nutrition: A Review of the Situation in Selected South-East Asian Countries.
[18]
Zeleke, A. and F. Enquasillase (2009). Prevalence of childhood and adolescent overweight and obesity among elementary school students in Addis Ababa: Double burden of malnutrition in Ethiopia. AAU electronics library.
[19]
WHO (2000). Adolescent Nutrition: A Review of the Situation in Selected South-East Asian Countries.
[20]
Yoseph Gebreyohannes, Solomon Shiferaw, Balem Demtsu, Gessessew Bugssa. Nutritional Status of Adolescents in Selected Government and Private Secondary Schools of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2014, pp. 504-514. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140306.13
[21]
Gurpreet Arora, G. K. Kochar, Gunjan Soni. Nutritional Awareness and Status of Adolescent Girls Studying in Schools of Urban and Rural Areas of District Kurukshetra. Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2015, pp. 126-130. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20150303.18
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186