Assessment of Nutritional Status & Health Condition Among Vegetarian and Non-vegetarian Adult at Tangail Sadar Upazila in Tangail District
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2016, Pages: 241-245
Received: May 4, 2016; Accepted: May 26, 2016; Published: Jun. 7, 2016
Views 1421      Downloads 87
Authors
Farhana Akther, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Tangail, Bangladesh
Mst Khodeza Akter, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Tangail, Bangladesh
Babu Kanta Sen, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Tangail, Bangladesh
Mizanur Rahman, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Tangail, Bangladesh
Mesbah Uddin Talukder, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Tangail, Bangladesh
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
A cross sectional comparative study was carried out to compare the nutritional status between the vegetarian and non-vegetarian individuals. The study was conducted among 100 respondents (50 vegetarian and 50 non-vegetarian) at Tangail sadar upazilla in Tangail district to assess their nutritional status by collecting anthropometric and socio-demographic data, dietary intake pattern as well as hygienic and clinical information. Among the respondents all the vegetarian were Hindu and majority of the non-vegetarian were Muslim (70%). The study found that nutritional status of 72% vegetarian and 62% non-vegetarian were normal. According to this study 4% vegetarian and 12% non-vegetarian respondents were underweight and 26% non-vegetarian and 24% vegetarian respondents were overweight respectively. Mean heights of vegetarian respondents was 161.62cm and mean weight 59.78 kg whereas mean height and weight of the non-vegetarian respondents were 158.62cm and 57.14 kg respectively. The study observed the food habits of the respondents. Vegetarian respondents consumed more leafy and non-leafy vegetables, pulses, and dairy based products avoiding egg, meat, and fish. Besides 64% non-vegetarian consumed fish and 24% consumed egg daily and 64% consumed meat weekly. The study findings strengthen the notion that the nutritional status of the vegetarian respondents are better than non-vegetarian due to their health consciousness and food intake pattern.
Keywords
Nutritional Status, Vegetarian, Non-vegetarian, Bmi, Tangail
To cite this article
Farhana Akther, Mst Khodeza Akter, Babu Kanta Sen, Mizanur Rahman, Mesbah Uddin Talukder, Assessment of Nutritional Status & Health Condition Among Vegetarian and Non-vegetarian Adult at Tangail Sadar Upazila in Tangail District, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2016, pp. 241-245. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20160504.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Michalak, J., X. C. Zhang, and F. Jacobi (2012). Vegetarian diet and mental disorders: results from a representative community survey International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9
[2]
Elmadfa, I. and I. Singer, (2009) Vitamin B-12 and homocysteine status among vegetarians: a global perspective, Am J ClinNutr, 89: 1693S-1698S.
[3]
Craig, W. J. (2009) Health effects of vegan diets, Am J ClinNutr, 89: 1627S-1633S.
[4]
Nakamoto, K., et al. (2009) A new Japanese vegetarian food guide, Asia Pac J Public Health, 21: 160-9.
[5]
Dunham, L. and L. M. Kollar (2006) Vegetarian eating for children and adolescents, J Pediatr Health Care, 20: 27-34.
[6]
Povey, R., B. Wellens, and M. Conner (2001) Attitudes towards following meat, vegetarian and vegan diets: an examination of the role of ambivalence, Appetite, 37: 15-26.3-6.
[7]
Forouzanfar, M. H., et al. (2012) Assessing the global burden of ischemic heart disease, part 2: analytic methods and estimates of the global epidemiology of ischemic heart disease in 2010, Glob Heart, 7: 331-342.
[8]
Murray, C. J., et al. (2012) Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 291 diseases and injuries in 21 regions, 1990-2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010, Lancet, 380: 2197-223.
[9]
Norrving, B. and B. Kissela (2013) The global burden of stroke and need for a continuum of care, Neurology, 80: S5-12.
[10]
Song, S. H. (2012) Emerging type 2 diabetes in young adults, AdvExp Med Biol, 771: 51 61.7-10.
[11]
Walker, P., et al. (2005) Public health implications of meat production and consumption, Public Health Nutr, 8: 348-56.
[12]
Djousse, L., et al. (2004) Fruit and vegetable consumption and LDL cholesterol: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study, Am J ClinNutr, 79: 213-7.
[13]
Higuchi, H., (2005) et al. Effects of the Vegetarian Diet on the Blood Rheology of Middle-aged Women [in Japanese], Memoirs of Osaka Kyoiku University II Social Science and Home Economics, 54: 1-9. 11-13.
[14]
Vitamin B12: Dietary supplementation fact sheet: Office of dietary supplemants. National Instinute of Health. http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional/ (accessed on: 02 May, 2013) (June 2011).
[15]
Noncommunicable diseases country profiles 2011. WHO global report in Noncommunicable diseases and mental health 2011, WHO: Genava. p. 209.
[16]
Ramaraj, R. and P. Chellappa (2008) Cardiovascular risk in South Asians, Postgrad Med J, 84: 518-23.5, 16.
[17]
Das, S. K., et al. (2012) Nutrition and lipid profile in general population and vegetarian individuals living in rural Bangladesh, Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy, 2.
[18]
Position paper on the vegetarian approach to eating. J Am Diet Assoc 1980; 77: 61-9
[19]
Ratzin R. Nutritional concerns for the vegetarian recreational athlete. In: Ratzin Jackson C, ed. Nutrition for the recreational athlete. Florida: CRC Press, Inc., 1995: 93-110.
[20]
Worsley A, Skrzypiec G. (1998) Teenage vegetarianism: prevalence, social and cognitive contexts. Appetite 30: 151-70.
[21]
Craig, W. (2009) Health effects of vegan diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 89 (suppl): p. 1627S-1633S.
[22]
Appleby P., Roddam, A, Allen, N, Key, T (2007) Comparative fracture risk in vegetarians and nonvegetarians in EPIC-Oxford. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61 (12): p. 1400-1406.
[23]
Craig, W. Mangels, AR, (2009) Position of the American Dietetic Association: Vegetarian Diets. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 109 (7): p. 1266-1282.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
548 FASHION AVENUE
NEW YORK, NY 10018
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-688-8931