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Cytodiagnosis of Dimorphic Fungi with Disseminated Infection in a HIV Positive Patient – A Diagnostic Dilemma
Science Journal of Clinical Medicine
Volume 4, Issue 4-1, July 2015, Pages: 19-22
Received: May 15, 2015; Accepted: May 16, 2015; Published: Aug. 3, 2015
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Authors
Chitresh Yadav, Department of pathology, faculty JSS Medical College & hospital, constituent of JSS University, Mysore, India
Nandini N. M., Department of pathology, faculty JSS Medical College & hospital, constituent of JSS University, Mysore, India
Shruti M. K., Department of pathology, faculty JSS Medical College & hospital, constituent of JSS University, Mysore, India
Sowmya G. S., Department of Microbiology, faculty JSS Medical College & hospital, constituent of JSS University, Mysore, India
M. R. Shivaprakash, Medical mycology division, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
G. V. Manjunath, Department of pathology, faculty JSS Medical College & hospital, constituent of JSS University, Mysore, India
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Abstract
Systemic mycosis caused by fungi (or dimorphic fungi) such as Histoplasma, emmonsia, candida & penicillium has emerged as an important opportunistic fungal infection in immunocompromised patient in South- East Asia. Several cases of opportunistic fungal infection has been reported but cytological diagnosis of disseminated (dimorphic) fungal infection has been reported in very few cases. Cytological diagnosis of these infections depending on the morphological characteristics has always been a challenge to practising cytologists. A case of rare disseminated fungal infection reported in a 45 year old seropositive male who is noncompliant on ART presented with ulcer over palate, fever, weight loss, occasional per rectal bleeding. On examination having bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. On investigation- anaemia, high ESR, deranged liver function test, CD4 count 16/cumm, USG showed hepatomegaly, underwent FNAC cervical lymphnodes and guided FNAC of liver, which showed these organisms, but no pathogens were found with classical microbiological procedure. Patient was treated with itraconazole and amphotericine and showed improvement. This case illustrate the utility of FNAC in early diagnosis & management of rare infection & it also highlight the combined role of molecular technique and FNAC as an interdisciplinary approach for management of patient.
Keywords
Dimorphic Fungal Infection, FNAC Lymph Node, Seropositive
To cite this article
Chitresh Yadav, Nandini N. M., Shruti M. K., Sowmya G. S., M. R. Shivaprakash, G. V. Manjunath, Cytodiagnosis of Dimorphic Fungi with Disseminated Infection in a HIV Positive Patient – A Diagnostic Dilemma, Science Journal of Clinical Medicine. Special Issue: Latest Different Concepts of Gynaecology. Vol. 4, No. 4-1, 2015, pp. 19-22. doi: 10.11648/j.sjcm.s.2015040401.15
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