Husbandry Practices and Utilization of Camel Products in Borana Zone of Southern Oromia, Ethiopia
Science Research
Volume 3, Issue 4, August 2015, Pages: 191-197
Received: May 8, 2015; Accepted: May 22, 2015; Published: Jul. 9, 2015
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Author
Dejene Takele Gebissa, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Yabello Pastoral and Dryland Agriculture Research Center, Dairy Research Team, Yabello, Ethiopia
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Abstract
This survey was conducted in Borana zone to assess camel husbandry and product utilization practices, and identify major constraints of camel production. The result showed that camel was ranked the first economically important livestock species followed by goats and cattle, consecutively. Per producer holding of female of 1-3 year, heifer of 3-5 year, matured female of greater than 5 year, male of 5 year, male of less than 5 year and breeding bull greater than 5 year camel was 4.17, 2.50, 3.83, 1.83, 0.50 and 0.50, respectively. Selection of breeding bull and female camel and uncontrolled mating was common practices. Lactation length was 13.38 months while daily milking frequencies were 3.24 and 2.57 during wet and dry season, respectively. Daily milk yield per camel was 8.4 and 4.75 liters for wet and dry seasons, respectively. A liter of camel milk cost 2.30 and 4 birr during wet and dry season, respectively. Disease, poisonous plants, and low extension and health services were the main problems of camel production. Boosting the capacity of the community on improved husbandry practices and product utilization, and developing coordinated efforts for camel diseases control and prevention schemes should be an assignments of all stakeholders.
Keywords
Camel, Husbandry Practices, Meat, Milk Utilization, Borana Zone, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Dejene Takele Gebissa, Husbandry Practices and Utilization of Camel Products in Borana Zone of Southern Oromia, Ethiopia, Science Research. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 191-197. doi: 10.11648/j.sr.20150304.16
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