Study on Prevalence of Fascioliasis in Ruminants in Dasht Room County in Spring and Summer of 2013
Animal and Veterinary Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2016, Pages: 15-18
Received: Jan. 14, 2016; Accepted: Jan. 25, 2016; Published: Mar. 12, 2016
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Authors
Moshfe Abdolali, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran
Rezaei Nasrabad Seyed Abbas, Student Research Committee, Yasuj of University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran
Cheraghzadeh Seyed Reza, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran
Arefkhah Nasir, Department of Parasitology and Mycology, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran
Zare Khafri Roohollah, Student Research Committee, Yasuj of University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran
Moein Masood, Student Research Committee, Yasuj of University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran
Parhizgari Najmeh, Student Research Committee, Yasuj of University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran
Jamshidi Ali, Department of Parasitology and Mycology, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran
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Abstract
Fasciola spp is one of the liver bile ducts and gallbladder Trematodes in Ruminants. In the life cycle of the worm, snails are intermediate hosts and parasitic infection is happened by eating aquatic vegetables contaminated with Metacercaria. Humans also can be infected with this worm. Thus, Finding the contaminated villages where high infection in animals is reported, can help to control diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of Fascioliasis in Ruminants in 2013 in Dasht Room area, a rural district in Yasuj prevalence. This cross - sectional study, a total of 600 stool samples from Ruminants, including sheep, goat and cattle were collected from six villages in Dasht Room region. The stool samples were transported to the Parasitology laboratory and tested by standard Acid - Ether precipitation method (Thelman method). Sediments were studied with an optical microscope at magnifications of ×10. 174 out of 600 stool samples (29%) were positive for Fasciola spp eggs, including 63 sheep (26/03%), 40 goats (23/3%) and 71 cattle (37/9%), respectively. Significant differences between the infection rates of live stocks were not observed in spring and summer season. The most contamination was observed in cattle and the least in goat. Statistically significant difference was observed between them in summer season (P <0/05). Considering to high contamination in the present study (29%), Dasht Room County is a high risk area for Fasciolosis in Ruminants.
Keywords
Fascioliasis, Ruminants, Iran
To cite this article
Moshfe Abdolali, Rezaei Nasrabad Seyed Abbas, Cheraghzadeh Seyed Reza, Arefkhah Nasir, Zare Khafri Roohollah, Moein Masood, Parhizgari Najmeh, Jamshidi Ali, Study on Prevalence of Fascioliasis in Ruminants in Dasht Room County in Spring and Summer of 2013, Animal and Veterinary Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp. 15-18. doi: 10.11648/j.avs.20160402.11
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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