Response of Hybrid Lowland Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Cultivar FARO44 to Salinity in Coastal Plain Sands of the Niger Delta, Nigeria
Journal of Plant Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 2, April 2015, Pages: 106-110
Received: Apr. 1, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 8, 2015; Published: Apr. 18, 2015
Views 4121      Downloads 157
Authors
Achinike Emoghene, Crop and Soil Science Department, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Elsie Ihuakwu Hamadina, Crop and Soil Science Department, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Andrew Efisue, Crop and Soil Science Department, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Salinity is veritable issue in coastal lowlands of Niger Delta, due to salt water intrusion, and can reduce yield of lowland rice. Hybrid lowland rice cultivar (particularly FARO44; SIPI) are currently distributed and cultivated across Nigerian agroecological zones but the specific effect of salinity on these hybrid rice varieties is not well defined. This study seeks to determine the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on germination and seedling growth of FARO44 (SIPI). The study was a pot experiment, with 5 levels of sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations (0, 1.0, 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 dS cm-1). The seeds took about 30days to germinate in the control, as compared to other treatments. Germination was 42% in the control, 45% at 1.0 dS cm-1 and 34% at 5.0 dS cm-1. A visual assessment for salt injury showed that the Control plants had normal growth of leaves and at 5.0 dS cm-1 NaCl, there was nearly normal growth of leaves but the tips of the leaves were whitish and rolled. Vegetative growth studies showed that the height to the first leaf in the control was 4.45m and the longest height to the first leave was recorded at 1.5 dS cm-1 NaCl. The tallest (38.7 cm) plants were observed at the 1.5 dS cm-1 NaCl treatment but it was statistically similar with other treatment expect in the control which had the lowest plant height (23.4 cm). The highest number of leaves was recorded at 1.5 dS cm-1 NaCl concentration, while lowest was recorded with 5.0 dS cm-1 NaCl. FARO44(SIPI) appears to tolerate NaCl of up to 1.5 dS cm-1.
Keywords
Tomato Hybrids, Heat Tolerance, Humid Tropics
To cite this article
Achinike Emoghene, Elsie Ihuakwu Hamadina, Andrew Efisue, Response of Hybrid Lowland Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Cultivar FARO44 to Salinity in Coastal Plain Sands of the Niger Delta, Nigeria, Journal of Plant Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2015, pp. 106-110. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.20150302.20
References
[1]
Remison, U. 2005. Arable and Vegetable Crops of the Tropics. Gift Prints Associates. pp19-30
[2]
Domnic, J. U. 2005. Crop Production Techniques in the Tropics. Concept Publication Limited, Lagos, Nigeria.
[3]
Imolehin, E.D. and A.C. Wada. 2000. Meeting the rice production and consumption demands of Nigeria with improved technologies. Int. Rice Com. Newsl. FAO http://www.fao.org/docrep/x7164t/x7164t04.htm#P0_0
[4]
IRRI, 2001. Annual Report,International Rice Research Institute, IRRI, Los Barros, Phillipines.
[5]
Singh, B.N., Fagade, S., Ukwungwu, M.N., Williarn, C., Jagtap, S.S., Oladimeji, O., Effisue, A. and Okhidievbie, O. 1997. Rice growing environments and biophysical constraints in different agroecological zones of Nigeria. Met. J., 2(1): 35-44.
[6]
IRRI. 1991. World Rice Statistics, p. 34-42.
[7]
IRRI. 1995. World Rice Statistics, p. 34-42
[8]
Asch, F., Wimmer, M. A. Keshav, P. D.and Udays, D. 2003. Boron Distribution Shows Sodium Distribution in Rice Leaves to be Independent of Transpiration. Conf. Int, Agr. Res. Devel. pp124
[9]
Yeo, A R., S. M. Caoorn and T. J. Flower. 1985. The Effect of Salinity Upon Photosynthesis in Rice (Oryza sativa L.): Gas Exchange by Individual Leaves in Relation to their Salt Content. J. Exp. Agr. 36:1240-1248
[10]
Shelp, B. J., E. Marentes. A. M. Kitheka, and P. Vivekanandan. 1995. Boron mobility in plants. Physiol. Plant 94: 356 - 361
[11]
Munns, R. 2002. Comparative physiology of salt and water stress. Plant Cell Environ. 25: 239 - 250
[12]
Tester M, and Davenport, R. 2003. Na+ tolerance and transport in higher plants. Ann. Bot. 91: 503 - 527
[13]
Sembring, H. and Gani. A. 2007. Adaptability of Rice on Tsunami Affected Soil. Training Workshop Soil Management for Rebuilding Agriculture in Tsunami Affected Areas in Nangrovve Acch Darussalam Province, Banda Acch. pp13-16
[14]
Richard LA. 1954. Diagnosis and improvement of saline and alkali soils. Agriculture Handbook No. 60. United States Department of Agriculture. Washington, USA: Government Printing Office.
[15]
Gregorio, G. B., D. Senadhira and R. D. Mendoza. 2002. Progress in Breeding for Salinity Tolerance and Associated Abiotic Stresses in Rice Field Crop Res. 76 (2-3); 91 - 101
[16]
Hossain, M. S. 2004. Effect of Salinity on Germination, Growth Biochemical Attributes and Yield of Rice Nutrients. M. Sc. Thesis. Bangladesh Agricultural University Mymensingh.
[17]
Khan, M.S.A, Hamid, A. and Karim. M.A. 1997.. Effect of Sodium Chloride on Germination and Seedling Characters of Different Types of Rice (Oryza sativa L). J. Agr. Crop Sci, 179: 163 – 169.
[18]
Islam, M. M and Karim, M.A.. 2011. Evaluation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes at germination and early seedling stage for their tolerance to salinity. Agriculturist 8(2):57-65
[19]
Dagar, I.C. 1996. Rehabilitation of coastal saline lands by planting suitable species. I. Ind. Soc. Coast. Agr. Res. 14 (1~2): 185-194
[20]
Zeng L and M. C., Shannon. 2000. Salinty effects on seedling growth and yield yomponents of rice. Crop Sci. 40: 996 - 1003
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186