Impairment of Ovarian and Uterine Cellular Architecture, Total Protein Content: A Consequence of Lead Nitrate Induced Increased Free Radical Load
Advances in Bioscience and Bioengineering
Volume 3, Issue 5, October 2015, Pages: 49-55
Received: Sep. 2, 2015; Accepted: Sep. 16, 2015; Published: Sep. 28, 2015
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Authors
Seema Rai, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya (A Central University), Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh
Muddasir Basheer, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya (A Central University), Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh
Deepika Acharya, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya (A Central University), Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh
Hindole Ghosh, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya (A Central University), Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh
Pritam Bhattacharya, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya (A Central University), Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh
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Abstract
A significant decrease in weight of ovary and oviduct of female rats was noted following lead nitrate administration with a dose 80 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. Histomicrogaphs of ovary showed marked inhibition of follicular growth as judged by gradual decrease oocyte size, absence of theca and granulosa layer, resulting absence of graafian follicle. Oviduct showed shrinkage in lumen and damage in perimetrium cells. Increase in total protein of ovary and oviduct after lead nitrate treatment denoting changes at translational level of concern gene to prevent the normal physiology. A significant increase in the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) of both tissues denotes increased free radical load resulted in the damage of cellular architecture. Findings, suggest that lead entering to the biological system via environment and other widely used industrial product may interfere with the normal reproductive physiology and folliculogenesis could be one of the cause of female infertility.
Keywords
Lead Nitrate Toxicity, TBARS, Ovary, Oviduct
To cite this article
Seema Rai, Muddasir Basheer, Deepika Acharya, Hindole Ghosh, Pritam Bhattacharya, Impairment of Ovarian and Uterine Cellular Architecture, Total Protein Content: A Consequence of Lead Nitrate Induced Increased Free Radical Load, Advances in Bioscience and Bioengineering. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2015, pp. 49-55. doi: 10.11648/j.abb.20150305.11
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