Evolutionary Relationship of Genomic Insulin Sequence in Different Mammalian Species: A Computational Approach
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Volume 1, Issue 2, October 2016, Pages: 23-28
Received: Aug. 17, 2016; Accepted: Sep. 5, 2016; Published: Sep. 22, 2016
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Authors
M. A Hashem, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology Chittagong (USTC), Foy’s Lake, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Neena Islam, National Centre for Control of Rheumatic Fever and Heart Diseases, Sher-E-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Md. Moinul Abedin Shuvo, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology Chittagong (USTC), Foy’s Lake, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Md. Arifuzzaman, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology Chittagong (USTC), Foy’s Lake, Chittagong, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Genomic insulin is located on the short arm of chromosome 11 in human genome. It is a well studied polypeptide hormone, consists of 110 amino acids which start with signaling peptide of 1-24 amino acids, B-chain of 25-54 amino acids, C-peptide of 55-89 amino acids and end with A-chain of 90-110 amino acids. Insulin, produced by the beta cell of the pancreas in response to glucose stimuli, binds to its receptor rapidly due to receptor autophosphorylation and primordially regulates nutritional metabolic pathways. In this study we have depicted and explored evolutionary conservation rate, insight into structure and phylogenetic connection of insulin molecule among eight mammalian species; Homo sapiens (Human), Bos taurus (Cattle), Cavia porcellus (Guinea pig), Canis lupus familiaris (Dog), Gorilla gorilla (Western gorilla), Ovis aries (Sheep), Pan troglodytes (Chimpanzee), Pongo pygmaeus (Orangutan) using Computational Biology. The analysis of physico-chemical characteristics, secondary and 3-D structure prediction of insulin in different species identified phylogenetically most related species. The major findings are that genomic insulin from Human and Dog has a lowest genetic distance of 0.13 of the mammalian species studied. Human and Guinea pig has the next lowest genetic distance of 0.39 and 69.1% identical at the amino acid level. Whereas Human and Western gorilla has genetic distances of 0.00 and 100% identical at the amino acid level and share a common node on the phylogenetic tree. Physico-chemical study also shows that these sequences show high leucine content (18.2%) with high instability index (>40) except Sheep and Cattle has low leucine and instability index (<40). The sequence analysis among species has allowed us to know the manner in which the insulin has evolved over million–year period. This study result provides rapid comprehensive information to calculate the amino acid sequences in relations to evolutionary conservation rates as well as molecular phylogenetics.
Keywords
Molecular Phylogenetics, Genomic Insulin, Multiple Sequence Alignment, Pairwise Distances, Physico-chemical Characteristics, Secondary Structure, 3D Structure Prediction
To cite this article
M. A Hashem, Neena Islam, Md. Moinul Abedin Shuvo, Md. Arifuzzaman, Evolutionary Relationship of Genomic Insulin Sequence in Different Mammalian Species: A Computational Approach, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Vol. 1, No. 2, 2016, pp. 23-28. doi: 10.11648/j.eeb.20160102.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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