Factors Affecting Adherence to Treatment of HIV in Exposed Infants in Mumias Region, Western Kenya
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 3, May 2015, Pages: 366-372
Received: Apr. 1, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 14, 2015; Published: Apr. 23, 2015
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Authors
Sophia Musenjeri, Institute of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases (ITROMID) Nairobi, Kenya, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya
Serah Mbatia, Institute of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases (ITROMID) Nairobi, Kenya, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya
Joseph Nganga, Jomo Kenyatta university of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya
Matilu Mwau, Consortium for National health research, Nairobi, Kenya
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Abstract
Objective: To determine social-demographic and economic factors affecting adherence to treatment of HIV in exposed infants in Mumias region, Western Kenya. Methods: The study was a descriptive cross sectional study carried out among parents of HIV exposed infants in selected health facilities in western Kenya. Through random sampling, the study recruited three hundred and eighty four (384) parents aged between 15-66 years old. The parents who were recruited were seeking HIV testing, treatment and care for their infants. The laboratory procedure involved automated assay: Abbott Real-time HIV-1. Secondly, structured interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect information from parentsof the affected infants. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: 5.2% (20) of the participants tested positive while 94.8% (364) tested negative. Married participants were more likely to adhere to treatment (Odds ratio (OR) =1.062, 95%CI 0.628-1.796 P<0.05). Educated participants were more likely to attend their clinical appointments compared to the non-educated (0R=1.140, 95% C.I 0.949-1.369 P<0.05). Participants aged above 35 years old were more likely to adhere to treatment compared to those below 35 years old (OR=1.029, 95% C.I 0.985-1.074 P<0.05). Participants whose children tested negative at 6 weeks were more likely to adhere to treatment (OR=0.652, 95% C.I 0.185-2.305 P<0.05). Parentsunder the support of Community Health Workers (CHW) were more likely to adhere to treatment (OR=1.226, 95%C.I 0.419-3.581 P<0.05). Non-stigmatized mothers were more likely to adhere to treatment (OR=1.101, P<95% C.I 0.545-2.223). Conclusion: Adherence to treatment and care of HIV in exposed infants appears to be a significant challenge for HIV diagnostic and preventive services. To forestall the consequences, the stakeholders and government have to support the parents both financially and socially especially through public awareness campaigns to encourage them to adhere to treatment and care services.
Keywords
Adherence HIV, Infants, Diagnosis, Stigma, CHW
To cite this article
Sophia Musenjeri, Serah Mbatia, Joseph Nganga, Matilu Mwau, Factors Affecting Adherence to Treatment of HIV in Exposed Infants in Mumias Region, Western Kenya, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2015, pp. 366-372. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20150303.20
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