Bypassing Primary Health Care Facilities for Common Childhood Illnesses in Sharg-Alneel Locality in Khartoum State, Sudan 2015
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2017, Pages: 77-87
Received: Dec. 17, 2016; Accepted: Jan. 9, 2017; Published: Feb. 9, 2017
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Authors
Malaz Elbashir Ahmed, Community Medicine, Federal Ministry of Health, Directorate General of Human Resources for Health Development, HRH Policy and Planning Director, Khartoum, Sudan
Talal Elfadil Mahdi, Community Medicine, Director General of the National Health Insurance Fund, Khartoum, Sudan
Nada Jaffar Osman Ahmed, Community Medicine, Federal Ministry of Health, Directorate General of Primary Health Care, Maternal and Child Health Director, Khartoum, Sudan
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Abstract
In Sudan despite the current implementation of universal health coverage policy, routine monitoring reports highlight that patients frequently bypass Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities in favor of higher-level hospitals, though hospitals are costly and time consuming. The main objective of this study was to study the extent of bypassing the public PHC facilities and factors associated with the decision of caretakers to bypass such facilities seeking care for their under-five year’s children with common illnesses in Sharg-Alneel locality, 2015. The study proposed strategies and interventions to the Sudan government -Federal Ministry of Health (FMoH) - to improve PHC service utilization The study was cross- sectional comparative study, interviewer administered questionnaires and facility assessment checklist was used for data collection. The data was analysed using SPSS. The study interviewed 497 caretakers, 87% of them pursued health care for their children directly from secondary hospitals. The main reasons for bypassing the closest public health facilities were unavailability of doctors, lack of health insurance services and higher cost of services. The proportion of bypassing a PHC facility for child care is significantly associated with child sex, child age, presenting symptoms of diarrhea, fever, difficult breathing and severe vomiting, caretakers’ occupation as well as the economic status. In a resource limited country, health policy to achieve universal health coverage is better to focus on quality of care as well as quantity. Community mobilization and interventions to improve access and utilization of quality PHC services are all recommended. Furthermore, more research on bypassing behaviour is also recommended.
Keywords
PHC, Child Health Services Utilization, Accessibility, Caretaker
To cite this article
Malaz Elbashir Ahmed, Talal Elfadil Mahdi, Nada Jaffar Osman Ahmed, Bypassing Primary Health Care Facilities for Common Childhood Illnesses in Sharg-Alneel Locality in Khartoum State, Sudan 2015, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 77-87. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20170502.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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