Palliative Care Situation in French Speaking African Countries: Example of the Sakoira Integrated Health Center in Republic of Niger (West Africa)
Central African Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 1, February 2017, Pages: 8-10
Received: Aug. 17, 2016; Accepted: Nov. 24, 2016; Published: Jan. 9, 2017
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Authors
Soumaila Boubacar, Integrated Health Center of Sakoira, District Hospital, Tillabéri, Niger; Department of Neurology, Fann National Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal; Ministry of Public Health, Niamey, Niger
Djibrilla Ben Adji, Ministry of Public Health, Niamey, Niger; Department of Medicine, National Hospital, Niamey, Niger
Youssoufa Maiga, Department of Neurology, Gabriel Touré University Hospital, Bamako, Mali
Malam Abdou Badé, Department of Hematology, National Hospital, Niamey, Niger
Alassane Mamadou Diop, Department of Neurology, Fann National Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal
Youssouf Yayé, Ministry of Public Health, Niamey, Niger
Moustapha Ndiaye, Department of Neurology, Fann National Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal; Faculty of Medicine, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal
Eric Adehossi, Department of Medicine, National Hospital, Niamey, Niger; Faculty of Health Science, Abdou Moumouni University, Niamey, Niger
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Abstract
In Niger, palliative care is a necessity in everyday medical practice. However, the setting up of structures and / or mobile teams specifically dedicated to palliative medicine still faces enormous challenges. Most patients who consult for non-communicable disease or specifically for tumors or other incurable illnesses as some neurological diseases come advanced stages, requiring palliative care whereas there is as yet no national structure specifically dedicated to palliative care. No domain of research in palliative care is developed in Niger. No specific scientific work on palliative care have been conducted and published in Niger. This testifies to the lack of promotion of this specialty in Niger. So the ignorance of palliative care, access to morphine and ordinary molecules fight against pain are a real obstacle to the practice of palliative medicine in Sakoira Integrated Health Center (Tillabéri) in republic of Niger.
Keywords
Palliative Care, Niger, Morphine, French, Africa
To cite this article
Soumaila Boubacar, Djibrilla Ben Adji, Youssoufa Maiga, Malam Abdou Badé, Alassane Mamadou Diop, Youssouf Yayé, Moustapha Ndiaye, Eric Adehossi, Palliative Care Situation in French Speaking African Countries: Example of the Sakoira Integrated Health Center in Republic of Niger (West Africa), Central African Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2017, pp. 8-10. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20170301.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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