Marginalized Labeling: An Evaluation of English Speaking Africans Classified as ESL Students
International Journal of Language and Linguistics
Volume 2, Issue 5-1, October 2014, Pages: 56-62
Received: Jul. 4, 2014; Accepted: Aug. 5, 2014; Published: Feb. 1, 2015
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Author
Olubukola Y. Salako, English Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania, United States of America
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Abstract
How should we view African students whose first language is English and their mother tongue? Should English speaking African students be placed in an ESL classroom with students whose English is not as proficient as theirs? This paper examines the essays of Nigerian students placed in an ESL class to determine if they are scholastically capable of opting out of the ESL classes required for international students. It also reflects on the classification system for English speaking Africans and their viewpoints on the use of the English language.
Keywords
ESL and African College Students
To cite this article
Olubukola Y. Salako, Marginalized Labeling: An Evaluation of English Speaking Africans Classified as ESL Students, International Journal of Language and Linguistics. Special Issue: Teaching English as a Foreign/Second Language. Vol. 2, No. 5-1, 2014, pp. 56-62. doi: 10.11648/j.ijll.s.2014020501.18
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