Proximate and Organoleptic Assessment of Indigenous Dishes Based on Pumpkin Leaves, Pulp and Seeds (Cucurbita pepo)
Advances in Biochemistry
Volume 2, Issue 5, October 2014, Pages: 65-70
Received: Sep. 4, 2014; Accepted: Sep. 22, 2014; Published: Sep. 30, 2014
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Authors
Obiakor-Okeke Philomena Ngozi, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Science Imo State University, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Ogbonna Ikenna Chukwuemeka, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Science Imo State University, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Amadi Joy, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Science Imo State University, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
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Abstract
Introduction: The study evaluated the proximate composition of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) based on leaves pulps and seeds and organoleptic attributes of dishes prepared using pumpkin pulps seeds and leaves were also determined. Methodology: The samples used in the study include raw seeds, uncooked pulp, leaves, roasted seeds and cooked pulp were prepared for proximate analysis and also different native meals were prepared using leaves for soup, pulp for pottage yam and seeds for snacks for sensory evaluation involving 25 panelists using nine point heldonic scale, the result of sensory evaluation was subjected to analysis using ANOVA and DUNCAN test to compare the means. The proximate analysis were determined following standard methods and means and standard deviation of triplicate samples were determine. Result: The results of proximate analysis showed that protein composition ranged from 2.23% in cooked pulp to 29.65% in raw seeds, the carbohydrate from 4.86% in uncooked pulp to 14.08% in roasted seeds, the fat from 0.92% in uncooked pulp to 43.28% in roasted seeds and the ash from 1.18% in cooked pulp to 14.86% in roasted seeds. The result of sensory evaluation revealed that samples pumpkin pulp pottage (PPP), pumpkin leaves soup (PLS) and roasted pumpkin seeds (RPS) are significantly different (P<0.05) for colour, PPP were preferred more and RPS were the least preferred. PPP were preferred more and RPS were the least preferred in flavor. Samples PPP and PLS were statistically similar but significantly different (P<0.05) from RPS. Samples PLS are significantly different (P<0.05) from PPP and RPS for texture, PLS were preferred more and RPS were the least preferred in texture. Samples PPP and PLS are statistically similar but significantly different (P<0.05) from RPS in generally acceptability. Conclusion: The result of this study showed that pumpkin has high nutrient profile concentrated in the different edible parts; the seed, pulp and leaves and it is also generally acceptable. Therefore we recommend that the vegetable be incorporated into our daily meals and all the different edible parts be consumed for variety and for its nutrient content. We also recommend that more research be done to consider the other nutritional value like minerals, vitamins and phytochemical composition of the vegetables.
Keywords
Proximate, Organoleptic Assessment, Indigenous Dishes, Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo)
To cite this article
Obiakor-Okeke Philomena Ngozi, Ogbonna Ikenna Chukwuemeka, Amadi Joy, Proximate and Organoleptic Assessment of Indigenous Dishes Based on Pumpkin Leaves, Pulp and Seeds (Cucurbita pepo), Advances in Biochemistry. Vol. 2, No. 5, 2014, pp. 65-70. doi: 10.11648/j.ab.20140205.12
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