Metabolic Differences in the Steatosis Induced by a High-Fat Diet and High-Protein-Fat Diet in Rats
Advances in Biochemistry
Volume 3, Issue 6, December 2015, Pages: 86-95
Received: Aug. 31, 2015; Accepted: Oct. 29, 2015; Published: Dec. 10, 2015
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Authors
Daphne Santoro Leonardi-Carvalho, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine de Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes, Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brasil
Sergio Zucoloto, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine de Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes, Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brasil
Paula Payão Ovidio, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes, Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brasil
Renato Heidor, Department of Food, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, University of São Paulo, Avenida Prof. Lineu Prestes, São Paulo-SP, Brasil
Thomas Prates Ong, Department of Food, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, University of São Paulo, Avenida Prof. Lineu Prestes, São Paulo-SP, Brasil
Fernando Salvador Moreno, Department of Food, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, University of São Paulo, Avenida Prof. Lineu Prestes, São Paulo-SP, Brasil
Alceu Afonso Jordao, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes, Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brasil
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Abstract
The study aim was to evaluate some effects of a high-fat diet and a high-protein-fat diet in the hepatic steatosis development in rats. Twenty nine Wistar rats were divided at random into three groups: Control: a control diet with soybean oil; HF: a high-fat diet with 50% of lard; HPF: a high-protein-fat diet with about 40% of protein and 50% of lard. The groups were fed with these diets during four weeks. The following parameters were analyzed: hepatic steatosis, serum and hepatic lipid profile, lipid peroxidation, antioxidants concentration and hepatocytes damage. The HF group showed the highest caloric intake per day and the highest weight gain (p<0.05). The hepatic cholesterol concentration was highest in the HF group and the serum total cholesterol concentration was highest in the HPF group (p<0.05). The macrovesicular steatosis was predominant in the HF group, with ballooning hepatocytes and Mallory bodies and in the HPF group predominant microvesicular steatosis was found, without ballooning hepatocytes and Mallory bodies. An increase in TBARS and a decrease in Vitamin E in the HF and HPF groups (p<0.05) was also found. The HF group showed the highest acid oleic deposit in the liver, followed by the HPF group. The SFA hepatic concentration was similar among the groups (p>0.05), whereas the MUFA concentration was higher in the HF and HPF (p>0.05) than the control group (p<0.05). Therefore, the experimental model used is an efficient model to study hepatic steatosis. The HF and HPF groups had the same behaviors for oxidative stress, serum glucose and hepatic damage in responses to the experimental diets, but these groups showed different esteatosis features.
Keywords
Hepatic Steatosis, Microvesicular Steatosis, High Fat Diet, High Protein Diet
To cite this article
Daphne Santoro Leonardi-Carvalho, Sergio Zucoloto, Paula Payão Ovidio, Renato Heidor, Thomas Prates Ong, Fernando Salvador Moreno, Alceu Afonso Jordao, Metabolic Differences in the Steatosis Induced by a High-Fat Diet and High-Protein-Fat Diet in Rats, Advances in Biochemistry. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 86-95. doi: 10.11648/j.ab.20150306.14
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