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Tsetse Flies (Diptera: Glossinidae) Population in Ethiopia: A Review
Advances in Biochemistry
Volume 8, Issue 3, September 2020, Pages: 45-51
Received: Oct. 6, 2020; Accepted: Oct. 17, 2020; Published: Oct. 26, 2020
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Authors
Abate Waldetensai, Ethiopian Public Health Institute (EPHI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Alemenesh Hailemariam, Ethiopian Public Health Institute (EPHI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Wondatir Nigatu, Ethiopian Public Health Institute (EPHI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Fekadu Gemechu, Ethiopian Public Health Institute (EPHI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Geremew Tasew, Ethiopian Public Health Institute (EPHI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Araya Eukubay, Ethiopian Public Health Institute (EPHI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Tsetse flies (Glossina) are obligate bloodsucking medical and veterinary important vectors of trypanosome which causes African sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in live stocks. There are 31 Glossina species in Africa of which Glossina pallidipes, G. morsitans, G. fuscipes, G. tachinoides and G. longipennis are found in different regions of Ethiopia particularly, in Amhara, Benishangul Gumuz, Gambella, Oromia and Southern part of Ethiopia. The distribution of the genus Glossina is restricted to lowland rainforest and wooded savannah regions and not uniform but often patchy. The fly has a significant impact on human health and rural development, probably capable of transmitting pathogenic trypanosomes that affect humans and domestic animals. In advance to any tsetse control operation, surveys are required to identify which flies are present in the area and determine their distribution. Towards designing suitable control methods and monitoring of Tsetse flies, it is important to first understand the behavior of the fly. Though there are human Trypanosomiasis studies and reports in Ethiopia, there are no current evidences on the extent of the disease, vector distribution and the magnitude of the problem. Therefore this review provides some background information on the taxonomical distribution of tsetse flies, their unique way of reproduction, and how their ecological affinities, their distribution and population dynamics influence and dictate control efforts. The paper also discusses the vector importance and the different strategies for tsetse control. Recommendations and future research needs are also suggested based on the reviewed literature.
Keywords
Glossinidae, Trypanosomiasis, Tsetse Fly Population, Distribution, Biology, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Abate Waldetensai, Alemenesh Hailemariam, Wondatir Nigatu, Fekadu Gemechu, Geremew Tasew, Araya Eukubay, Tsetse Flies (Diptera: Glossinidae) Population in Ethiopia: A Review, Advances in Biochemistry. Vol. 8, No. 3, 2020, pp. 45-51. doi: 10.11648/j.ab.20200803.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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