Current Understanding on Tail Regeneration in Green Anoles (Anolis carolinensis)
Cell Biology
Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2016, Pages: 9-17
Received: Sep. 21, 2016; Accepted: Sep. 29, 2016; Published: Oct. 27, 2016
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Authors
Zulkar Nain, Department of Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Md Ariful Islam, Department of Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Sadrul Hasan Chowdhury, Department of Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Sadia Afroza, Department of Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Iftakhar Hussain, Department of Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science & Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Regeneration of lost tail is of great importance to lizards. Anolis carolinensis, a green lizard, is capable of regenerating its tail efficiently after autotomy. Hence, it is considered as a model organism in regeneration study. A. carolinensis shed its tail in order to distract the predator’s attention and thus makes a way to escape. Restoring of the amputated tail takes several days and the mechanism is currently clearly understood. Although save its life, tail regeneration is associated with the impairment of several vital functions in anoles. In addition, various differences have been observed between original and regenerated tail in terms of mechanism and structure. To date, very little work has been conducted on tail autotomy and regeneration at molecular and genetic level. The genes responsible for regeneration in anoles are identified recently. These genes are evolutionarily conserved through all tetrapod vertebrates. They are, however, in a state of ‘switched-off’ in other vertebrates including humans. Consequently, a throughout study of these so-called ‘switched-off’ genes may provide a way of restoring lost organs in human, and thus could revolutionize the modern medical science.
Keywords
Green Anole, Tail Autotomy, Regeneration, MicroRNAs, Anolis Carolinensis
To cite this article
Zulkar Nain, Md Ariful Islam, Sadrul Hasan Chowdhury, Sadia Afroza, Iftakhar Hussain, Current Understanding on Tail Regeneration in Green Anoles (Anolis carolinensis), Cell Biology. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp. 9-17. doi: 10.11648/j.cb.20160402.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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