The Levels of Serum C - reactive protein and Creatine Kinase-MM in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seropositive Subjects Co-infected with Plasmodium falciparum
International Journal of Immunology
Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2017, Pages: 37-40
Received: Mar. 4, 2017; Accepted: Mar. 24, 2017; Published: Apr. 14, 2017
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Authors
Digban Kester, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, College of Health Sciences, Igbinedion University, Okada, Nigeria
Ehiaghe Friday Alfred, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, College of Health Sciences, Igbinedion University, Okada, Nigeria; Department of Hematology and Immunohematology, College of Health Sciences, Igbinedion University, Okada, Nigeria
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Abstract
The present study was designed to determine the levels of C-reactive protein and creatine kinase-MM in Nigerian naïve (stage 2) HIV seropositive subjects co-infected with Plasmodium falciparum. A total of 204 subjects (aged between 18 and 45 years) were randomly studied. Among these were 74 naïve (stage 2) HIV seropositive subjects (confirmed by Western blot method), 70 naïve (stage 2) HIV seropositive subjects co-infected with P. falciparum (confirmed by Western blot and microscopic methods respectively) and 60 apparently healthy individuals (confirmed to be negative for Human immunodeficiency virus and P. falciparum by Western blot and microscopic methods respectively). Absolute lymphocyte counts was estimated using Sysmex® Automated Hematology Analyzer, whereas CD4+ cell count was estimated using Partec® Cyflow Counter. C-reactive protein and creatine kinase was estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. The creatine kinase-MM and C-reactive protein concentrations were significantly higher in HIV seropositive subjects co-infected with malaria when compared with the controls subjects (P = 0.000) respectively. Whereas the absolute lymphocyte counts and CD4+ T cell counts were significantly lower in HIV seropositive subjects co-infected with malaria when compared with the controls subjects (P = 0.000). The increased expression of C- reactive protein and creatine kinase-MM coupled with the decrease in absolute lymphocyte and CD4+ cell counts significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of HIV and P. falciparum infections.
Keywords
C - reactive Protein, Creatine Kinase-MM, Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Stage 2, Plasmodium falciparum
To cite this article
Digban Kester, Ehiaghe Friday Alfred, The Levels of Serum C - reactive protein and Creatine Kinase-MM in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seropositive Subjects Co-infected with Plasmodium falciparum, International Journal of Immunology. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 37-40. doi: 10.11648/j.iji.20170502.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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