Characterization of Phenotypic Variability of Sudanese Gum Arabic Tree Acacia Senegal var. senegal Using Multiprimer Random Amplificatıon of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD)
International Journal of Genetics and Genomics
Volume 4, Issue 3, June 2016, Pages: 20-23
Received: May 21, 2016; Accepted: Jun. 8, 2016; Published: Jun. 20, 2016
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Authors
Saad Samah Mahgoub Hassan Mohammed, Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Ankara, Ankara, Turkey
Mukhtar Moawia Mohammed, Institute of Endemic Diseases, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
Warag Essam Eelldin, Faculty of Forestry, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
Elamin Hassan Basher, Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, Khartoum, Sudan
Aycan Murat, Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Ankara, Ankara, Turkey
Yıldız Mustafa, Department of Field Crops, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ankara, Ankara, Turkey
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Abstract
Acacia Senegal var. senegal (Gum Arabic) as it is known world-wide, is one of the most important trees in Sudan with valuable contribution to the national income export commodity. Gum Arabic is an important ingridunt in several medicinal and food products. Little is known on the genetic markers and diversity of Acacia senegal. To our knowledge, this is the first study represents attempt to characterize genotypic variability of Acacia senegal var. senegal. The aim of this study was the molecular characterization of Acacia senegal var senegal using RAPD technique as molecular marker and to correlate the results obtained from genetic marker with the production and the geographical distribution of the trees. Acacia seeds were collected from different geographical areas of Sudan. Seeds of trees Acacia senegal var. senegal were cultivated in small pots. The seeds were germinated for 4 to 6 weeks then the new leaves were collected for DNA extraction using CTAB protocol. DNA was also extracted from the roots. Two octamer RAPD primers were evaluated for amplification of Acacia DNA. Phylogenetic tree was constructed based on RAPD-PCR which clustered the trees from each geographic area as separate group that were genetically related. The data showed a common ancestor of the three clusters suggesting.
Keywords
Acacia Senegal var. senegal, Molecular Characterization, RAPD
To cite this article
Saad Samah Mahgoub Hassan Mohammed, Mukhtar Moawia Mohammed, Warag Essam Eelldin, Elamin Hassan Basher, Aycan Murat, Yıldız Mustafa, Characterization of Phenotypic Variability of Sudanese Gum Arabic Tree Acacia Senegal var. senegal Using Multiprimer Random Amplificatıon of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), International Journal of Genetics and Genomics. Vol. 4, No. 3, 2016, pp. 20-23. doi: 10.11648/j.ijgg.20160403.12
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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