Phenotypic and Reproductive Parameters of Barking Deer Under Management Condition of Chittagong Zoo
International Journal of Genetics and Genomics
Volume 4, Issue 5, October 2016, Pages: 40-44
Received: Oct. 30, 2016; Accepted: Nov. 21, 2016; Published: Jan. 3, 2017
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Authors
Omar Faruk Miazi, Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University Khulshi, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Gous Miah, Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University Khulshi, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Tahmina Bilkis, Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University Khulshi, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Md. Kabirul Islam Khan, Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University Khulshi, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Ashutosh Das, Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University Khulshi, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Md. Moksedul Momin, Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University Khulshi, Chittagong, Bangladesh
Mohammad Showkat Mahmud, Bangladesh Livestock Research Institute, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Palash Chandra Dey, Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University Khulshi, Chittagong, Bangladesh
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Abstract
The study was conducted to know about the phenotypic parameters and reproductive parameters of barking deer under feeding management at Chittagong Zoo. Data were collected for a period of 3 months from 04 deer from 1 st September 2013 to 30th November 2013 on all age groups. The deer were kept within an open enclosure measured as 66.52 m2 with a fence of chain link mash, 3.6m in height. Available feeds supplied to deer were gram, rice bran, green gourd, pumpkin, carrot and amloki. The coat color was reddish and “V” Shaped black colored forehead and black colored muzzle. The ear length of males and females were 3.5±0.5 and 3.5 inch. The length of foreleg for male and female were 20 and 19 inch and the length of hind leg for male and female were 22 and 21 inch. The length of antlers was 3 inch. Distance between ear of male and female were 3.7 and 3.6 inch. The average birth weight of males and females were ranging from 1-1.5 kg and 0.5-0.7 kg, males and females weaning weight were ranging from 10-12 kg and 08-10 kg respectively. Adult male’s and female’s weight were ranging from 25-30 kg and 20-25 kg. It was also observed that the weaning age, length of estrous cycle, age at first fawning and gestation length were ranging from 4-6 months; 12-20 days, 14-18 month and 6-7 month, respectively.
Keywords
Barking Deer, Chittagong Zoo, Phenotypic Characters, Reproductive Parameters
To cite this article
Omar Faruk Miazi, Gous Miah, Tahmina Bilkis, Md. Kabirul Islam Khan, Ashutosh Das, Md. Moksedul Momin, Mohammad Showkat Mahmud, Palash Chandra Dey, Phenotypic and Reproductive Parameters of Barking Deer Under Management Condition of Chittagong Zoo, International Journal of Genetics and Genomics. Vol. 4, No. 5, 2016, pp. 40-44. doi: 10.11648/j.ijgg.20160405.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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