Earthworm Biomass as Additional Information for Risk Assessment of PCBs: A Case Study of Olusosun Dumpsite, Ojota, Lagos, Nigeria
American Journal of Life Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 3-1, May 2017, Pages: 52-59
Received: Jan. 6, 2017; Accepted: Feb. 10, 2017; Published: Apr. 11, 2017
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Authors
Alani Rose, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
Akinsanya B., Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
Erhabor-Chimezie M., Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
Nwude D., Department of Chemical Sciences, Bells University of Technology, Otta, Nigeria
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Abstract
This study assessed the level of Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations and the biochemical parameters in earthworms (E. eugeniae) as well as histopathological effects in the clitellium of earthworms (E. eugeniae) present in Olusosun dumpsite which is the largest dumpsite in Lagos and University of Lagos, a major higher institution located in Lagos, Nigeria. The earthworms were sampled from two different sites in each location and taken to the laboratory for PCBs, biochemical and histopathological analyses. The level of concentration of PCBs in earthworms found in Unilag was significantly higher than the level observed in Olusosun dumpsite. With respect to the biochemical analysis carried out on the clitellum of the earthworm samples collected from Olusosun dumpsite, Malondialdehyde (MDA), Superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) and GST had higher levels when compared with the sample collected from the University of Lagos study site (non-dump site). High levels of Glutathione content (GSH) and Catalase activities (CAT) were only recorded in earthworms from the Unilag sample when also compared with the sample from Olusosun study site. The activities of the enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were inhibited in Unilag sample. Histopathological assessments of the clitellium indicated that the major effect observed were increased secretory activity, reduced body mass and disorganized internal organ in the earthworms from Unilag. The implication of the findings in the earthworms from Olusosun dumpsite and University of Lagos are hereby discussed.
Keywords
PCBs, Olusosun Dumpsite, Earthworms, Histopathological Assessment, Glutathione
To cite this article
Alani Rose, Akinsanya B., Erhabor-Chimezie M., Nwude D., Earthworm Biomass as Additional Information for Risk Assessment of PCBs: A Case Study of Olusosun Dumpsite, Ojota, Lagos, Nigeria, American Journal of Life Sciences. Special Issue:Environmental Toxicology. Vol. 5, No. 3-1, 2017, pp. 52-59. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.s.2017050301.18
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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