Determination of Appropriate Planting Time for Dekoko (Pisum sativum var. abyssinicum) Productivity Improvement in Raya Valley, Northern Ethiopia
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 5, Issue 3, June 2016, Pages: 43-47
Received: Apr. 15, 2016; Accepted: Apr. 22, 2016; Published: Jun. 4, 2016
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Authors
Berhane Sibhatu, Department of Agronomy, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Mehoni Agricultural Research Center, Maichew, Ethiopia
Hayelom Berhe, Land and Water Research Process, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Mehoni Agricultural Research Center, Maichew, Ethiopia
Gebremeskel Gebrekorkos, Department of Agronomy, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Mehoni Agricultural Research Center, Maichew, Ethiopia
Kasaye Abera, Department of Agronomy, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Mehoni Agricultural Research Center, Maichew, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Dekoko is highly appreciated by the local people for its taste and high market value. However, productivity of Dekoko is limited by improper planting time. An experiment on Dekoko planting time was, therefore, conducted in 2013 and 2014 cropping seasons to determine the appropriate planting time of Dekoko that maximizes its productivity under rain fed conditions. Treatments comprised combinations of four planting time (dry planting about 5-7 days before the beginning of main rain season, when the rain fall amount received greater or equal to 10 mm at once or cumulative, when the rain fall amount received greater or equal to 20 mm at once or cumulative and when the rain fall amount received greater or equal to 30 mm at once or cumulative) were carried out in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with three replications. The analyzed result showed that days to maturity, number of pods plant-1, grain and biomass yields were significantly influenced (P<0.05) by planting time. Dekoko matured late during dry planting. Dekoko planted when the rain fall amount received is greater or equal to 20 mm at once or cumulative gave high (21) number of pods plant-1. Similarly, the maximum grain (533.53 - 638.00 kg ha-1) and biomass (1635.23 - 1820.06 kg ha-1) yields were produced during planting time when the rain fall amount received is greater or equal to 20 mm at once or cumulative, while the minimum values were due to dry planting. It is, therefore, concluded that planting of Dekoko when the rain fall amount received is greater or equal to 20 mm at once or cumulative can be recommended for the growers in the study area to improve Dekoko productivity. Moreover, further research works on different varieties along with different soil moisture levels, planting dates and soil types can be a step forward to identify best sustainable technology on the growth and yield improvements of Dekoko.
Keywords
Dekoko, Planting Time, Yield, Yield Components
To cite this article
Berhane Sibhatu, Hayelom Berhe, Gebremeskel Gebrekorkos, Kasaye Abera, Determination of Appropriate Planting Time for Dekoko (Pisum sativum var. abyssinicum) Productivity Improvement in Raya Valley, Northern Ethiopia, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2016, pp. 43-47. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20160503.13
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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