Impact of Integrated Fertilization (Organic and In-Organic) on Grain Yield of Maize
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 6, Issue 5, October 2017, Pages: 178-183
Received: Aug. 15, 2017; Accepted: Sep. 6, 2017; Published: Oct. 2, 2017
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Authors
Muhammad Bilal, Faculty of Crops & Food Sciences, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Muhammad Tayyab, Faculty of Crops & Food Sciences, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Irfan Aziz, Faculty of Crops & Food Sciences, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Abdul Basir, Department of Agronomy, University of Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan
Bilal Ahmad, Faculty of Crops & Food Sciences, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Umair Khan, Faculty of Crops & Food Sciences, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Muhammad Zahid, Faculty of Crop Production Sciences, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan
Naveed Ali, Faculty of Crops & Food Sciences, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
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Abstract
Organic manure is a commendable organic fertilizer, as it contains nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other essential nutrients. The most important factors responsible for low yield are inappropriate crop nutrition management and poor soil fertility. The field experiment was performed to evaluate the impact of different fertilizer (organic and inorganic) on yield and yield components of maize at Agriculture Research Station Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa during summer season 2014. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) replicated three times. Data was recorded on seven quantitative traits i.e. days to tasseling, plant height (cm), leaf area, number of grains cob-1, biological yield (kg ha-1), 1000-grain weight (g) and grain yield (kg ha-1). All treatments were significantly affected by the applied treatments with the exception of days to tasseling. The treatment poultry manure gave maximum leaf area whereas minimum leaf area was obtained in control. Maximum plant height (cm), number of grains cob-1, 1000-grain weight (g), biological yield (kg ha-1), and grain yield (kg ha-1) was obtained in compost applied treatment followed by poultry manure. Whereas minimum plant height (cm), grains cob-1, biological yield (kg ha-1), 1000-grain weight (g) and grain yield (kg ha-1) was obtained in control. The results depicted that organic fertilizer gave excellent response for yield and its related traits of maize crop as compared to inorganic fertilizer.
Keywords
Maize, Compost, Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers, Grain Yield
To cite this article
Muhammad Bilal, Muhammad Tayyab, Irfan Aziz, Abdul Basir, Bilal Ahmad, Umair Khan, Muhammad Zahid, Naveed Ali, Impact of Integrated Fertilization (Organic and In-Organic) on Grain Yield of Maize, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 6, No. 5, 2017, pp. 178-183. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20170605.16
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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