Spatial Patterns of Nutrient Distribution in Dalingshan Forest Soil of Guangdong Province China
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 4, Issue 3-1, May 2015, Pages: 1-4
Received: Feb. 25, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 25, 2015; Published: May 19, 2015
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Authors
Egbuche C. T., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria; College of Forest Ecology, South China Agricultural University Guangzhou, China
Su Zhiyoa, College of Forest Ecology, South China Agricultural University Guangzhou, China
Anyanwu J. C., Department of Environmental Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Nigeria
Onweremadu E. U., Department of Soil Science Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Nigeria
Nwaihu E. C., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria
Umeojiakor A. O., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria
A. E. Ibe, Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria
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Abstract
Spatial nutrients that includes OM, Avail.K, Avail.P and TN distribution and the influences on vegetation patterns in Dalingshan was the cardinal focus of this study. Ecological data (moisture content, bulk density and topography) were considered. One way ANOVA was statistically tested of spatial distribution of major nutrients across 4 plots which indicated non significant at p = 0.05 level, TN (p = 0.0216), OM (p = 0.00004), Avail.K (p = 0.00216) respectively. Furthermore one way ANOVA was tested on acidity level (pH) measured against the nutrients distribution TN (p = 0.0031), OM (p = 0.0004), Avail.K (p = 0.0216) respectively at non significance level but available phosphorous was significantly different (p = 0.6412). The study revealed unique spatial patterns of soil nutrient distribution in Dalingshan and species abundance while vegetation census posed a new direction of study that may be adapted for a broad range of regional vegetation and floristic modeling. This paper suggests that forest soil nutrients and vegetation interaction can be utilized for further studies on multifactor ecosystem responses towards regional ecological restoration.
Keywords
Spatial Patterns, Soil Nutrient, Vegetation Cover, TWINSPAN, Dalingshan Guangdong Province China
To cite this article
Egbuche C. T., Su Zhiyoa, Anyanwu J. C., Onweremadu E. U., Nwaihu E. C., Umeojiakor A. O., A. E. Ibe, Spatial Patterns of Nutrient Distribution in Dalingshan Forest Soil of Guangdong Province China, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Special Issue: Environment and Applied Science Management in a Changing Global Climate. Vol. 4, No. 3-1, 2015, pp. 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.s.2015040301.11
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