Variability in selected Properties of Crude Oil – Polluted Soils of Izombe, Northern Niger Delta, Nigeria
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 4, Issue 3-1, May 2015, Pages: 29-33
Received: Feb. 25, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 25, 2015; Published: May 19, 2015
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Authors
Ihem E. E., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Osuji G. E., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Onweremadu E. U., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Uzoho B. U., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Nkwopara U. N., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Ahukemere C. M., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Onwudike S. O., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Ndukwu B. N., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Osisi A. S., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Okoli N. H., Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
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Abstract
We investigated the variability in some soil properties influenced by crude oil-polluted soils of Izombe in Northern Niger Delta of Nigeria in 2013. A free survey technique was used in the field sampling with nine profile pits dug in the site. Routine soil analysis was conducted on some physico-chemical properties including heavy metals. Soil data were subjected to analysis of variance using proc mix-model of SAS software at P 0.05. Results showed that soils were dark grayish brown to red in colour. Soils of the studied area were also deep (>100cm), well drained and having percent sands (>80%). Soils from crude oil-polluted site showed lower pH (<3.92) than the unpolluted soils with pH >4.00. Soil organic matter, C:N ratio, TEA and percent Al. Sat, were appreciably higher in soils affected by crude oil pollution. Unaffected soils by crude oil pollution exhibited higher TN, P, TEB and B.Sat. Heavy metal concentrations in the polluted sites were relatively higher than their unaffected counterparts and were significant (p 0.05). Further studies should be conducted on some other properties and in owner-managed farm establishments.
Keywords
Variability, Crude Oil, Soil Quality, Tropical Soils
To cite this article
Ihem E. E., Osuji G. E., Onweremadu E. U., Uzoho B. U., Nkwopara U. N., Ahukemere C. M., Onwudike S. O., Ndukwu B. N., Osisi A. S., Okoli N. H., Variability in selected Properties of Crude Oil – Polluted Soils of Izombe, Northern Niger Delta, Nigeria, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Special Issue: Environment and Applied Science Management in a Changing Global Climate. Vol. 4, No. 3-1, 2015, pp. 29-33. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.s.2015040301.15
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