Effect of Selected Tree Species on Maximizing Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration in Imo State, Nigeria
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 4, Issue 3-1, May 2015, Pages: 40-45
Received: Feb. 25, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 25, 2015; Published: May 19, 2015
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Authors
Umeojiakor A. O., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Egbuche C. T., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Ubaekwe R. E., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Nwaihu E. C., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
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Abstract
The world is currently experiencing a period of warming and the role of soil carbon pools for mitigation of greenhouse gases has encouraged the need for more knowledge on the tree species effects on soil organic carbon. The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of tree species on maximizing soil organic carbon sequestration in Imo State, Nigeria. Four tree species (Teak, Tectona grandis, linn, Gmelina, Gmelina arborea Roxb, Rubber plant, Hevea bransiliensis Mull. Arg. and Black velvet, Dialium guineense Wild) were chosen for the study. Random soil sampling was used in field studies. Soil samples were collected at the depth of 0-15cm and 15-30cm. these soil samples were prepared and subjected to routine laboratory analysis. Soil organic carbon sequestration was calculated and relationships between soil organic carbon sequestration and soil properties were obtained by simple correlation. Results showed that Tectona grandis of sequestration value 154.1 and 116.8 at top soil and subsoil respectively provides the best option for maximizing carbon sequestration in the soil, followed by Hevea bransiliensis (147.4 and 91.1), Gmelina arborea (134.1 and 81.1) and least was in Dialium guineese (108.1 and 60.1) at all depth. There was significant (P = 0.01) positive correlation between base saturation, calcium, total nitrogen with soil organic carbon sequestration at r –values of 0.77, 0.74 and 0.97 respectively. Hence, negative correlation existed between soil pH, clay fraction potassium with soil organic carbon sequestration with r-values of – 0.37, -0.68 and -0.54 respectively. It can be concluded that soil organic carbon sequestration decreases with decreasing depths and were greatly affected by tree species, soil properties and management practices.
Keywords
Tree Species, Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration, Soil Properties, Management Practices
To cite this article
Umeojiakor A. O., Egbuche C. T., Ubaekwe R. E., Nwaihu E. C., Effect of Selected Tree Species on Maximizing Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration in Imo State, Nigeria, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Special Issue:Environment and Applied Science Management in a Changing Global Climate. Vol. 4, No. 3-1, 2015, pp. 40-45. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.s.2015040301.17
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