The Impact of Deforestation on Soil Conditions in Anambra State of Nigeria
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 4, Issue 3-1, May 2015, Pages: 64-69
Received: Feb. 25, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 25, 2015; Published: May 19, 2015
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Authors
Anyanwu J. C., Department of Environmental Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Egbuche C. T., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Techhnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Amaku. G. E., Department of Environmental Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Duruora J. O., Collage of Education, Nsugbe Anambra State, Nigeria
Onwuagba, S. M., Department of Environmental Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
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Abstract
The research was carried out to determine the impact of deforestation on soil conditions in Anambra State. Ten soil samples were collected at random at a depth of 0-35cm below the litter layer from forests and farmlands. The soil samples were collected and analyzed for pH, field capacity, soil moisture, organic carbon, bulk density, soil micro-organism and particle size distribution. The result revealed that soil texture was mostly sandy except in some areas such as Atani, Nzam, Mmiata and Oroma-etiti, where it was generally heavy (clay loam). The result also revealed that the soil samples from the forests have better physical, chemical and biological properties compared to samples from farmlands. The results showed considerable variation for the soil physical, chemical and biological properties across the study area. Soil data were analyzed using Least Significant Difference (LSD). The analysis revealed that the main effect of land use was significant (p<0.05) for soil moisture, bulk density, organic carbon, organic matter, pH, viable bacteria number and viable fungal propagule. It was not significant for sand, silt, clay and field capacity. The interaction effect of location and land use on soil properties were significant (p<0.05) only for soil moisture, it was not significant for other soil variables. The study recommended, among others, the protection of forests from deforestation so as to maintain good soil conditions in the study area.
Keywords
Soil Texture, Least Significant Difference, Soil Properties, Forests, Farmlands
To cite this article
Anyanwu J. C., Egbuche C. T., Amaku. G. E., Duruora J. O., Onwuagba, S. M., The Impact of Deforestation on Soil Conditions in Anambra State of Nigeria, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Special Issue: Environment and Applied Science Management in a Changing Global Climate. Vol. 4, No. 3-1, 2015, pp. 64-69. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.s.2015040301.21
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