Bee-Keeping for Wealth Creation Among Rural Community Dwellers in Imo State, South-Eastern, Nigeria
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 4, Issue 3-1, May 2015, Pages: 73-80
Received: Feb. 25, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 25, 2015; Published: May 19, 2015
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Authors
Nwaihu E. C., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria
Egbuche C. T., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria
Onuoha G. N., Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria
Ibe A. E., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria
Umeojiakor A. O., Department of Forestry and Wildlife Technology, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State Nigeria
Chukwu, A. O., Department of Agric Economics, Extension and Rural Development, Imo State University Owerri, Nigeria
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Abstract
This study was carried out in Imo State, South Eastern Agro-Ecological Zone of Nigeria. Five Local Government Areas and five communities were selected for the study. From the five communities, eight (8) Bee-Keepers were selected on purposive basis based on list of bee-keepers collected from Imo ADP field staff. This gave a total of 40 respondents for the study. Data for the study was collected using questionnaire, and oral interview schedule. Both primary and secondary data were used in addition to internet services. The information elicited from the respondents were based on the objectives of the study such as socio-economic characteristics, cost and return on beekeeping, constraints militating against beekeeping and the prospects of the enterprise. The data generated were analyzed using descriptive statistics such as percentages, frequency distribution tables, mean, Gross Margin and Net Farm Income. The result showed that the mean age of the respondents was 37 years, male respondents accounted for 72.5%, 40% had tertiary education, and family labor was the major source of labor. Personal savings (equity fund) was the major source of finance (85%), 55% had information from ADP Extension Agents, 80% use Kenyan Topbar, major Bee products processed were honey (60%) and Bee wax (40). It is profitable in the area as initial cost outlay was N15,900 and returns (Total revenue) is N42,000, thus getting N39,300 as gross marginal income with N26,100 as Net Farm Income (NFI). Lack of finance was the major constraint militating against the enterprise (39.6%) followed by Non-colonization of hives (l8.7%). However, worthwhile recommendation on making fund available to Beekeepers by Commercial Banks, engaging the services of extension staff and use of appropriate attractants like sugar solution and sweet fresh palm wine were proffered as solution to some of the teething constraints. However, the enterprise of beekeeping has bright future prospects in the area, considering the number (40) already in practice. Therefore, beekeeping can create wealth in the area and beyond.
Keywords
Bee-Keeping, Wealth Creation, Rural Community Dwellers, Imo State Nigeria
To cite this article
Nwaihu E. C., Egbuche C. T., Onuoha G. N., Ibe A. E., Umeojiakor A. O., Chukwu, A. O., Bee-Keeping for Wealth Creation Among Rural Community Dwellers in Imo State, South-Eastern, Nigeria, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Special Issue:Environment and Applied Science Management in a Changing Global Climate. Vol. 4, No. 3-1, 2015, pp. 73-80. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.s.2015040301.23
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