Effect of Tillage Methods on the Growth and Yeild of Egg Plant (Solanum macrocarpon)
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 4, Issue 3-1, May 2015, Pages: 86-89
Received: Apr. 30, 2015; Accepted: May 1, 2015; Published: May 19, 2015
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Authors
Ibeawuchi I. I., Department of Crop Science and Technology, School of Agriculture and Agricultural Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Ihejirika G. O., Department of Crop Science and Technology, School of Agriculture and Agricultural Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Egbuche C. T., Department of Forestry and Wildlife, School of Agriculture and Agricultural Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Jaja E. T., Department of Applied and Environmental Biology, Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Nkpolu, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
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Abstract
The experiments on the effects of different tillage method (Flat, Bed and Trench) on the yield of egg plant (Solanum macrocarpon ) were conducted at School of Agriculture and Agricultural Technology (SAAT) Training and Research farm, Federal University of Technology Owerri, (FUTO), Imo State Nigeria. The result showed that plant heights of Solanum macrocarpon increased with age of the plant. The apices cutting technique helped to increase the number of branches per plant and the bed tillage method performed significantly better than the flat and trench methods in flower set , fruit set and development. However, tillage methods are location specific and vary with climate, soil type, and crop and management level.
Keywords
Tillage methods, effect of tillage, growth and yield, Solanum macrocarpon
To cite this article
Ibeawuchi I. I., Ihejirika G. O., Egbuche C. T., Jaja E. T., Effect of Tillage Methods on the Growth and Yeild of Egg Plant (Solanum macrocarpon), Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Special Issue: Environment and Applied Science Management in a Changing Global Climate. Vol. 4, No. 3-1, 2015, pp. 86-89. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.s.2015040301.25
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