Green Revolution in Chemistry by Microwave Assisted Synthesis: A Review
Modern Chemistry
Volume 1, Issue 3, June 2013, Pages: 22-25
Received: Dec. 3, 2013; Published: Jan. 10, 2014
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Savita Belwal, Department of Chemical Engineering, CVSR College of Engineering, Hyderabad (A. P.)
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Abstract
Green chemistry efficiently utilizes raw materials (preferably renewable), eliminates waste, and avoids the use of toxic or hazardous reagents and solvents in the manufacture and application of chemical products. Microwave assisted technique opens up new opportunities to the synthetic chemist in the form of new reactions that are not feasible using conventional heating and serve a flexible platform for chemical reactions. Over the past five years there has been a dramatic uptake in the use of microwaves as an energy source to promote synthetic transformations. Microwave-assisted synthesis (MAOS) is clearly a method by which the laboratory chemist can achieve goals in a fraction of the time as compared to traditional conductive heating methods. Reaction times in the best cases have been reduced from hours or days to minutes. The basic mechanisms observed in microwave assisted synthesis are dipolar polarization and conduction. The technique offers a simple, clean, fast, efficient, and economic way for the synthesis of a large number of molecules, providing the momentum for many chemists to switch from traditional heating methods to microwave assisted chemistry. In the present article an attempt was made to focus on what is microwave assisted synthesis, how is it generated and what importance may it have.
Keywords
Microwave Radiation, Electromagnetic Spectrum, Green Chemistry
To cite this article
Savita Belwal, Green Revolution in Chemistry by Microwave Assisted Synthesis: A Review, Modern Chemistry. Vol. 1, No. 3, 2013, pp. 22-25. doi: 10.11648/j.mc.20130103.11
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