Study the Formation Possibility of some Iron Slag Based Glasses
Modern Chemistry
Volume 5, Issue 1, February 2017, Pages: 7-10
Received: Sep. 5, 2016; Accepted: Jan. 25, 2017; Published: Feb. 24, 2017
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Authors
H. M. Gomaa, Glass Tech. Dept., Higher Institute of Optics Technology, Cairo, Egypt
A. G. Mostafa, Physics Dept., Faculty of Science, El-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
M. M. H. Eshtewi, Phys. Dept., Faculty of Science, Sert University, Sert, Libya
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Abstract
In an attempt to take advantage of industrial wastes, Iron slag was used to prepare some of glass samples in an attempt to re-use. The following chemical formula has considered in the preparation process. (25 + x) % slag + (75 - x) % (Na2B4O7.10H2O), where x has varied among different values. The rapid quenching method has used to prepare the glass samples, of thier molten components at 1200°C. When x > 45 had not be obtained any glasses, in the conditions of preparation. Both FTIR and XRD showed that each sample contains x ≤ 45 had formed perfect glass state. Density and molar volume showed that the glass structure became more open with increasing concentration of the slag.
Keywords
Slag Glasses, Glasses, Amorphous Materials, Inorganic Compounds, Oxides
To cite this article
H. M. Gomaa, A. G. Mostafa, M. M. H. Eshtewi, Study the Formation Possibility of some Iron Slag Based Glasses, Modern Chemistry. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp. 7-10. doi: 10.11648/j.mc.20170501.12
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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