A Physical Explanation on Why Our Space Is Three Dimensional
American Journal of Modern Physics
Volume 6, Issue 6, November 2017, Pages: 122-126
Received: Aug. 12, 2017; Accepted: Aug. 28, 2017; Published: Sep. 21, 2017
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Author
Hua Ma, The College of Science, Air Force University of Engineering, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China
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Abstract
It is a basic, ancient and mysterious issue: why our space is three dimensional? This issue is related to philosophy, mathematics, physics and even religion, and thus aroused great research interests. The author makes an in-depth analysis of the problem, and finally comes to a conclusion: For any vector space with symmetry, orthogonality, homogeneity and completeness, the space dimension must be three on condition that: the energy obeys the law of conservation, the dynamics law is governed by the covariance principle, and thus the cross-product must can be defined in the space. Our space just meets and requires the above constraints, so its dimension is three.
Keywords
Space-time, Dimension, Energy Conservation Law, Covariance Principle, Field Tensor, Cross-product
To cite this article
Hua Ma, A Physical Explanation on Why Our Space Is Three Dimensional, American Journal of Modern Physics. Vol. 6, No. 6, 2017, pp. 122-126. doi: 10.11648/j.ajmp.20170606.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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