A Study of Effects of Machining Parameters on Tool Life
International Journal of Materials Science and Applications
Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2014, Pages: 183-199
Received: Aug. 21, 2014; Accepted: Sep. 4, 2014; Published: Sep. 20, 2014
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Authors
Sunday Joshua Ojolo, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Lagos, Akoka-Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria
Olugbenga Ogunkomaiya, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Lagos, Akoka-Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria
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Abstract
This work involves the investigation carried out to study the effects of machining parameters on tool life under dry machining environment. Three cutting tool materials (HSS blank tool - M2 C66, tungsten carbide insert tool grade P-10, DMNG carbide insert tool 150412-SA) and work materials (medium carbon steel 0.4 wt% C, mild steel 0.29 wt% C, brass C330) were examined. The experiments were conducted under three different spindle speeds (900, 1120, 1400rev/min); feed rates (0.1, 0.2, 0.3mm/rev) and depths of cut (0.5, 1.0, 1.5mm). The settings of machining parameters were determined by using the Taguchi experimental design method. The level of importance of the machining parameters on tool life was determined by using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The optimum machining parameters combination was obtained by using the analysis of signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. The relationship between cutting parameters and tool life was obtained. From the results, the spindle speed had the most significant effects on tool life followed by feed rate and the depth of cut. The life of the HSS when cutting the three work pieces (medium carbon steel, mild steel and brass) was 161s, 321s and 386s respectively. The life of tungsten carbide when cutting the three work materials was 480s, 726s and 1028s respectively. The life of DMNG carbide were 782s using medium carbon steel, 864s using mild steel, and 1183s using brass. The shortest life of the three cutting tool materials (HSS, tungsten carbide and DMNG carbide) on the three work material (medium carbon steel, mild steel and brass) occurred at cutting speed (1400 rev/min), feed rate (0.3 mm/rev) and depth of cut (1.5 mm), where the life of the HSS were (15s using medium carbon steel, 58s using mild steel, 94s using brass). The life of tungsten carbide were (135s using medium carbon steel, 180s using mild steel, 274s using brass) and the life of DMNG carbide were (219s using medium carbon steel, 215s using mild steel, 311s using brass). The increment of spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut value mostly will affect the tool life.
Keywords
Machining Operation, Cutting Tools, Cutting Conditions, Taguchi Method, ANOVA
To cite this article
Sunday Joshua Ojolo, Olugbenga Ogunkomaiya, A Study of Effects of Machining Parameters on Tool Life, International Journal of Materials Science and Applications. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2014, pp. 183-199. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmsa.20140305.19
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