“Semiconductor” Model of the “Polymer-CNTs” Composite Strengthening
International Journal of Materials Science and Applications
Volume 8, Issue 6, November 2019, Pages: 120-126
Received: Aug. 20, 2019; Published: Dec. 3, 2019
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Authors
Karachevtseva Liudmyla, Technology and Business Department, Ningbo University of Technology, Ningbo, China; Department of Photonic Crystals, V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Kartel Mykola, Technology and Business Department, Ningbo University of Technology, Ningbo, China; Department of Carbon Nanomaterials, O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Wang Bo, Technology and Business Department, Ningbo University of Technology, Ningbo, China
Lytvynenko Oleg, Department of Photonic Crystals, V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Onyshchenko Volodymyr, Department of Photonic Crystals, V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Sementsov Yurii, Technology and Business Department, Ningbo University of Technology, Ningbo, China; Department of Carbon Nanomaterials, O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Trachevskyi Viacheslav, Technology and Business Department, Ningbo University of Technology, Ningbo, China
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Abstract
We analyzed “semiconductor” model of the “polymer-CNTs” composite strengthening at 300 K and low (0.1-0.5) wt% CNTs concentration. Carbon nanotubes are among the most anisotropic materials known and have extremely high values of Young's modulus. We investigated influence of vibration bonds on polymer crystallization and strengthening in composite films of polyethylenimine, polyamide, polypropylene and rubber with multiwall carbon nanotubes. IR absorbance maxima we evaluated after formation of composite “polyethylenimine-carbon nanotube” in the spectral area of the sp3 hybridization bonds at the frequency of primary amino groups of polyethylenimine. High IR absorption in the spectral area of sp3 hybridization bonds of polypropylene, polyamide-6 with carbon nanotubes is determined by γω(CН) and γω(CH2) vibrations. We measured IR reflectance maxima of composite “rubber-carbon nanotube” in the spectral area of CH valence and deformation vibrations. The IR peak dependence on the carbon nanotube content corresponds to 1D Gaussian curve for the diffusion equation in the electric field between electrons of nanotubes and protons in polymer according to “semiconductor” model of the composite structuring. For our case of the long-acting hundreds nanometer interactions, the polymer crystallization depends on sp3 C-C bonds organization in the intrinsic electric field according to the semiconductor n-p model. Tensile strength for polyamide-6 composites at 0.25% CNTs increases 1.7 times and tensile deformation – 2.3 times.
Keywords
Polymer Composites, Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes, Electric Field
To cite this article
Karachevtseva Liudmyla, Kartel Mykola, Wang Bo, Lytvynenko Oleg, Onyshchenko Volodymyr, Sementsov Yurii, Trachevskyi Viacheslav, “Semiconductor” Model of the “Polymer-CNTs” Composite Strengthening, International Journal of Materials Science and Applications. Vol. 8, No. 6, 2019, pp. 120-126. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmsa.20190806.15
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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