Spatial Correlation Analysis of 2013 Per capita GDP in the Area of Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei
American Journal of Theoretical and Applied Statistics
Volume 4, Issue 4, July 2015, Pages: 312-316
Received: Jul. 1, 2015; Accepted: Jul. 7, 2015; Published: Jul. 17, 2015
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Authors
Renhao Jin, School of Information, Beijing Wuzi University, Beijing, China
Tao Liu, School of Information, Beijing Wuzi University, Beijing, China
Fang Yan, School of Information, Beijing Wuzi University, Beijing, China
Jie Zhu, School of Information, Beijing Wuzi University, Beijing, China
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Abstract
This paper is based on the Moran's I coefficient and Geary's c coefficient, and with the support of SAS statistical analysis software, using the spatial analysis of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei’s per capita GDP and Geographical coordinates together. The research results show that the Moran's I coefficient is 0.098, Geary's c coefficient is 0.868, which is showing that there is a positive correlation between Beijing-Tianjin- Hebei region’s city economy. But the degree of correlation is low, which is showing that Beijing-Tianj-Hebei collaborative development is still in the initial stage, and regional economic integration has not fully realized.
Keywords
Regional Economic Integration, Collaborative Development, Spatial Analysis
To cite this article
Renhao Jin, Tao Liu, Fang Yan, Jie Zhu, Spatial Correlation Analysis of 2013 Per capita GDP in the Area of Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei, American Journal of Theoretical and Applied Statistics. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2015, pp. 312-316. doi: 10.11648/j.ajtas.20150404.22
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