The Major Socio-Economic and Demographic Determinants and Differentials of Fertility Decline in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
American Journal of Theoretical and Applied Statistics
Volume 6, Issue 6, November 2017, Pages: 335-344
Received: Nov. 10, 2017; Accepted: Nov. 20, 2017; Published: Dec. 25, 2017
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Author
Asrat Atsedeweyn Andargie, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia
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Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess the major socio- economic and demographic determinants of fertility decline in Addis Ababa. A sample of 315 currently-married women of reproductive age groups (between 15-49 years) were selected through stratified and simple random sampling techniques among the eligible women residing in Arada sub City, Addis Ababa. To put this study in to effect, primary data were collected on the basis of face-to-face interview approach using structured questioners. To this end, the major socio-economic and demographic determinants of this fertility decline are identified using descriptive and logistic regression techniques. The result of the analysis indicate that religion, women educational level, region, source of income, residential status, increase in awareness to contraceptive use, annual monthly income and marriage length were the most generic reasons by which fertility has declined in Addis Ababa. Poor employment prospects and relatively high housing costs are likely factors that encourage couples to delay marriage and reduce marital fertility.
Keywords
Fertility, Logistic Regression, Major Socio-Economic and Demographic Determinants, Sampling Techniques
To cite this article
Asrat Atsedeweyn Andargie, The Major Socio-Economic and Demographic Determinants and Differentials of Fertility Decline in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, American Journal of Theoretical and Applied Statistics. Vol. 6, No. 6, 2017, pp. 335-344. doi: 10.11648/j.ajtas.20170606.20
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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