Heat Distribution at Joints of Subjects with Musculoskeletal and Neuromuscular Dysfunctions
Clinical Medicine Research
Volume 3, Issue 3, May 2014, Pages: 74-79
Received: May 21, 2014; Accepted: Jun. 9, 2014; Published: Jun. 20, 2014
Views 3129      Downloads 129
Authors
Onigbinde Ayodele Teslim, Department of Medical Rehabilitation, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria
Fadare Oluseye Emmanuel, Department of Medical Rehabilitation, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria
Akindoyin Olubukola, Department of Medical Rehabilitation, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria
Tarimo Nesto, Malawi Against Physical disabilities, P.O.Box 256, Blantyre, Malawi
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Body temperature is being speculated to be accurate for diagnosis and also monitor chronicity of diseases. Most studies on skin temperature are obsolete and were mostly done in Europe, and racial differences have been noted to have profound effect on human health. The primary objective of this study was to compare the temperatures on the affected and unaffected sides of selected patients with neuromuscular and musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Sixty-nine patients with neuromuscular and musculoskeletal disorders participated in the study. Temperatures were taken at both the pathologic and non-pathologic joints. Data obtained were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics of paired t-test at 0.05 alpha levels. The results showed no significant difference between axillary, elbow, wrist, knee and ankle joints temperature of the pathologic and non-pathologic upper extremities of subjects with neurological conditions A mean skin temperature difference of 0.29 °C was observed between neuromuscular and musculoskeletal dysfunctions. However, within subjects with musculoskeletal dysfunctions; the skin temperature at the pathologic knee joint was significantly higher than that of the non-pathologic knee joint (t = 2.43, p = 0.02). We concluded that, for patients with neuromuscular dysfunctions; there was a minor but an insignificant decrease in skin temperature of pathologic joints compared to that of non-pathologic joints. The mean skin temperature at the pathologic knee joint of patients with musculoskeletal dysfunctions was significantly higher than that of the non-pathologic knee joint.
Keywords
Skin Temperature, Musculoskeletal, Neuromuscular, Diagnosis
To cite this article
Onigbinde Ayodele Teslim, Fadare Oluseye Emmanuel, Akindoyin Olubukola, Tarimo Nesto, Heat Distribution at Joints of Subjects with Musculoskeletal and Neuromuscular Dysfunctions, Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2014, pp. 74-79. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20140303.15
References
[1]
Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network. Postoperative Management in Adults: a Practical Guide to Postoperative Care for Clinical Staf. Edinburgh: SIGN, 2004, www.sign.ac.uk/pdf/sign77.pdf
[2]
National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (2007). Acutely Ill patients in Hospital: Recognition of response to acute Illness in Adults in Hospital, London. NICE, www.nice.org.uk/CG50.
[3]
Nursing Practice educator. Measuring body temperature 2012 Nursing Times 06.11.12 / Vol 108 No 45 / www.nursingtimes.net. Accessed on the 14th May 14, 2014
[4]
Poikalainen V, J. Praks, I. Veermäe and E. Kokin. Infrared temperature patterns of cow’s body as an indicator for health control at precision cattle farming. Agronomy Research Biosystem Engineering Special Issue 1, 187-194, 2012
[5]
Pocock G, Richards C (2009) The Human Body: an Introduction for the Biomedical and Health Sciences. New York, NY: Oxford University Press
[6]
Childs C. Maintaining body temperature. In: Brooker C, Nicol M (eds) Alexander’s Nursing, 2011. Accessed on the 14th May 14, 2014
[7]
Thomas D, Ansell BM, Smith DS Isaacs RJ http://www. ncbi.nlm.nih gov/pubmed/ 73610271980. Accessed on the 14th May 14, 2014
[8]
Wouter D van Marken Lichtenbelt, Hein A.M. Daanen, Loek Wouters, Rolf Fronczek, Roy J.E.M. Raymann d Natascha , M.W.Severens f, Eus J.W. Van Someren. Evaluation of wireless determination of skin temperature using iButtons. Physiology & Behavior 88 (2006) 489–497
[9]
Nield LS, Kamat D. Fever In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF. Nelson textbook of paediatrics, 19th eds. Philadephia, PA, Elsevier DSaunders; 2011: 896.
[10]
Horvath S M, Hollander J L, 1949. Intra-articular temperature as a measure of a reaction. J Clin Invest; 28: 469-73.
[11]
Bacon PA, Collins AJ, Ring EFJ, Cosh JA, Thermography in the assessment of inflammatory arthritis. Clin Rheum Dis, 1976, 2: 51-65
[12]
Marieb E, Hoehn K (2010) Human Anatomy and Physiology with Interactive Physiology 10-System Suite. New York, NY: Pearson Publishing.
[13]
Wasner G, Schattschneider J, Baron R. Skin temperature side differences--a diagnostic tool for CRPS?Pain. 2002 Jul; 98 (1-2):19-26.
[14]
Naver Hans, Christian Blomstrand, Sven Ekholm, Christer Jensen, Thomas Karlsson, B. Gunnar Wallin, 1995. Autonomic and Thermal Sensory Symptoms and Dysfunction After Stroke. American stroke association, www.m.stroke.ahajournals.org. Accessed on 14th May 2014.
[15]
Mulley G. Axillary temperature differences in hemiplegia. Postgraduate Medical College, 1980, 56, 248.
[16]
Labar DR, Mohr JP, Nichols FT, Fenwick TN, Tatemichi. Unilateral hyperhydrosis after cerebral infarction. Neurology, 1988, 38:1679 – 1682.
[17]
Horvath S M, Hollander J L, 1949. Intra-articular temperature as a measure of joint reaction. J Clin Invest; 28: 469-73.
[18]
Salisbury Richard S, Graham Parr, Malcolm De Silva, Brian L.Hazzleman and Page-Thomas. Heat distribution over normal and abnormal joints: thermal pattern and quantification. Ann Rheu Dis, 1983, 42, 494-499
[19]
Korthuis RJ, San Rafael (CA), 2011.Skeletal Muscle Circulation: Exercise Hyperemia and Regulation of Tissue Oxygenation during Muscular Activity. Morgan and Claypool Life Sciences, 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/book. Accessed on the 14th May 14, 2014.
[20]
Miller J. Why does body temperature increase during exercise. Livestrong.com, 2013. Accessed on the 14th May 14, 2014
[21]
Kim MS, Seo DH, Lim MH, Kim TU, Lee SJ, Hyun JK. Skin temperature changes following sciatic nerve injury in rats. J Neurotrauma. 2012 Dec 10; 29 (18):2738-47.
[22]
Oliver Herrmann, Victoria Tarabin, Shgeaki Suzuki, Nicholas Attigah, Irinel Coerea, Armin Schneider, Johannes Vogel, Simeon Prinz, Stefan Schwab, Hannah Monyer, Frank Brombacher, Markus Schwaninger. Regulation of body temperature and neuroprotection by endogeniousinterleukin-6in cerebral ischemia. Hourn of cerebral blood flow and metabolism, 2003, 23, 406 – 415
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186