Carboxymethyllysine, an Advanced Glycation End-Product, Promotes the Invasion and Migration of Lung Cancer A549 Cells
Clinical Medicine Research
Volume 6, Issue 5, September 2017, Pages: 149-156
Received: Aug. 8, 2017; Accepted: Sep. 7, 2017; Published: Oct. 16, 2017
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Authors
Te-chun Hsia, Department of Respiratory Therapy, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan; Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan
Mei-chin Yin, Department of Food Nutrition and Health Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung City, Taiwan
Zhi-hong Wang, Department of Food Nutrition and Health Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung City, Taiwan
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Abstract
Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML), an advanced glycation end-product (AGE), at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/l upon invasion and migration of A549 cells, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, were investigated. Results showed that CML at used test doses did not affect A549 cell growth. However, CML at 4-16 μmol/l enhanced both invasion and migration, and stimulated the release of reactive oxygen species, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in A549 cells. CML at 2-16 μmol/l increased protein expression of AGE receptor, p47phox, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, fibronectin, kappa-B (NF- κB) p65 and p-p38 in A549 cells. CML only at 4-16 μmol/l increased matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression in A549 cells. These findings indicated that CML might benefit NSCLC metastasis through promoting invasion and migration.
Keywords
Carboxymethyllysine, Advanced Glycation End Products, NSCLC, A549 Cell, Migration, Invasion
To cite this article
Te-chun Hsia, Mei-chin Yin, Zhi-hong Wang, Carboxymethyllysine, an Advanced Glycation End-Product, Promotes the Invasion and Migration of Lung Cancer A549 Cells, Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 6, No. 5, 2017, pp. 149-156. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20170605.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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