Continuous Glucose Monitoring in the Cardiac ICU: Current Use and Future Directions
Clinical Medicine Research
Volume 6, Issue 6, November 2017, Pages: 173-176
Received: Sep. 4, 2017; Accepted: Oct. 24, 2017; Published: Nov. 24, 2017
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Authors
Laura A. Scrimgeour, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Cardiovascular Research Center, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
Brittany A. Potz, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Cardiovascular Research Center, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
Frank W. Sellke, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Cardiovascular Research Center, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
M. Ruhul Abid, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Cardiovascular Research Center, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
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Abstract
Perioperative glucose control is highly important, particularly for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Variable glucose levels before, during and after cardiac surgery lead to increased post-operative complications and patient mortality. [1] Current methods for intensive monitoring and treating hyperglycemia in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) usually involve hourly glucose monitoring and continuous intravenous insulin infusions. With the advent of more accurate subcutaneous glucose monitoring systems, the role of improved glucose control with newer systems deserves consideration for widespread adoption.
Keywords
Continuous Glucose Monitoring, ICU, Cardiac Surgery
To cite this article
Laura A. Scrimgeour, Brittany A. Potz, Frank W. Sellke, M. Ruhul Abid, Continuous Glucose Monitoring in the Cardiac ICU: Current Use and Future Directions, Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 6, No. 6, 2017, pp. 173-176. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20170606.12
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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