Challenges Faced by Radiography Students During Clinical Training
Clinical Medicine Research
Volume 4, Issue 3-1, May 2015, Pages: 36-41
Received: Jan. 30, 2015; Accepted: Jan. 30, 2015; Published: Mar. 21, 2015
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Authors
Kyei K. A., Department of Radiography, School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Korle-Bu, Accra, Ghana
Antwi W. K., Department of Radiography, School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Korle-Bu, Accra, Ghana
Bamfo-Quaicoe K., Department of Radiography, School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Korle-Bu, Accra, Ghana
Offei R. O., Department of Radiography, School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Korle-Bu, Accra, Ghana
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Abstract
Background: Clinical training forms part of the requirements of every radiography student, for the award of Bachelor’s degree at the University of Ghana. The effectiveness of clinical training is responsible for the competency level that would be demonstrated by qualified radiography students. However, the capabilities of department to provide adaptive and well managed clinical training for undergraduate students have been reported as a limiting factor. Aim: The purpose of the study was to identify challenges facing the student radiographers during clinical training. Methods: The study was a quantitative one which employed a descriptive survey approach. The survey comprised of levels 300 and 400 students of the department of radiography which gathered forty-two (42) participants. A questionnaire was used to collect data for the study. Data obtained was summarized as frequencies, percentages, means and standard deviations using SPSS version 16.0. Results: The study revealed challenges faced by radiography students such as the gap between theory and practices, inadequate exposure to certain specialized procedures and time allotted to each treatment room. Conclusion: The study showed that clinical training can be enhanced by providing enough equipments and clinical areas for students, also films and cassettes must be made available before the date and time of clinical training. Finally, the theory aspects of clinical training must be in tune with the practice to enhance effective learning experience by students.
Keywords
Clinical Training, Challenges, Skill Development; Supportive Learning
To cite this article
Kyei K. A., Antwi W. K., Bamfo-Quaicoe K., Offei R. O., Challenges Faced by Radiography Students During Clinical Training, Clinical Medicine Research. Special Issue: Radiographic Practice Situation in a Developing Country. Vol. 4, No. 3-1, 2015, pp. 36-41. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.s.2015040301.18
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