Nursing Students’ Expectations and Evaluations of Mentors’ Competences and Mentors’ Self-Evaluations as Indicators of Mentoring Process Quality
American Journal of Nursing Science
Volume 6, Issue 5, October 2017, Pages: 382-386
Received: Aug. 20, 2017; Accepted: Sep. 13, 2017; Published: Sep. 19, 2017
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Authors
Robert Lovrić, Faculty of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia
Nada Prlić, Faculty of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia
Ivana Barać, Faculty of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia
Radivoje Radić, Faculty of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia
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Abstract
Important information about the clinical education can be revealed by nursing students’ initial expectations and final evaluation of mentors’ competences, and mentor’s self-evaluation of their competences. The aim of this study was to examine whether these constructs can be used for evaluating the atmosphere in clinical education. This was a nonexperimental prospective study. Data were collected between January and April 2012, in 12 clinics at the University Hospital Osijek. The participants were undergraduate nursing students in years 1, 2, and 3 (n = 150) and their mentors (n = 35) at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Osijek, during the academic year of 2012/2013. The instrument was a modified version of the questionnaire taken from The Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory (NCTEI). Prior to clinical practice, the students evaluated the desirability of each competence expected from a mentor; after the clinical practice, the students estimated how often their mentor possessed and applied those competences. Mentors have evaluated their own competences according to the same items. Comparison of students’ expectations and estimates shows significantly higher expectations of first and third year students (p <0.001). Mentors’ self-assessed competences, compared to students' evaluations, were rated significantly higher by mentors of all three years (p <0,001). The comparison of nursing students’ initial expectations and final evaluation of mentors’ competences, and mentor’s self-evaluation of their competences, when they are significantly different, can provide relevant information about potential problem in clinical education.
Keywords
Nurse, Mentoring, Evaluation, Quality Indicators
To cite this article
Robert Lovrić, Nada Prlić, Ivana Barać, Radivoje Radić, Nursing Students’ Expectations and Evaluations of Mentors’ Competences and Mentors’ Self-Evaluations as Indicators of Mentoring Process Quality, American Journal of Nursing Science. Vol. 6, No. 5, 2017, pp. 382-386. doi: 10.11648/j.ajns.20170605.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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