The Effect of Nursing Intervention of Postoperative Thirst in Patients after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
American Journal of Nursing Science
Volume 7, Issue 3, June 2018, Pages: 106-108
Received: Apr. 21, 2018; Accepted: May 7, 2018; Published: May 28, 2018
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Authors
Wang Xiaolan, Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; School of Nursing, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
Liu Cuiqing, Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; School of Nursing, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
Zhou Yulan, Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; School of Nursing, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
Huang Lu, Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; School of Nursing, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
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Abstract
Objective To explore the best method to relieve thirst in patients after laparoscopic cholecystectomy through comparison. Methods 60 patients after undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into Q-tip group and spraying group. In the Q-tip group, warm boiled water-absorbing Q-tips were applied to embrocate the lips of patients and in the spraying group warm boiled water was sprayed into the oral cavity of the patients once per hour or given when needed within 6 hours after operation so as to compare which method was more effective to relieve thirst. Results Operations were performed well in both groups and there was no postoperative complication. It was shown that warm boiled water spraying achieved better result in relieving thirst 6 hours after operation (P<0.05). Conclusions Warm boiled water spraying is more effective than warm boiled water-absorbing Q-tip unction to relieve thirst in patients after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Keywords
Thirst, Post Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy, Warm Boiled Water, Unction, Spraying
To cite this article
Wang Xiaolan, Liu Cuiqing, Zhou Yulan, Huang Lu, The Effect of Nursing Intervention of Postoperative Thirst in Patients after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy, American Journal of Nursing Science. Vol. 7, No. 3, 2018, pp. 106-108. doi: 10.11648/j.ajns.20180703.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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