Adhesive Interactions between Gelatinised Starch Granules
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 4, July 2013, Pages: 207-212
Received: Jun. 28, 2013; Published: Aug. 10, 2013
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Authors
Salah Mohamed Hasan, Department of Food Science and Technology, Omar al Mukhtar University, El-Beida, Libya
Agoub Abdella Agoub, Department of Food Science and Technology, Omar al Mukhtar University, El-Beida, Libya
Ramadan Elsalhin Abdolgader, Department of Food Science and Technology, Omar al Mukhtar University, El-Beida, Libya
Eileen O'Neill, Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Cork University, Cork, Ireland
Edwin Morris, Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Cork University, Cork, Ireland
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Abstract
Different starches were extracted from wheat flour and maize flour. Thermal transitions can be monitored directly by the technique of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two peaks were observed the first peak refer to the gelatinization temperatures where occurred at ~53-54ºC and the second peak was attributed to the dissociation of amylose–lipid complex. In addition the rheological properties of starches from wheat and maize flours were characterized by using low-amplitude oscillation. The results showed that Starch samples formed weak-gel networks by association between swollen granules. Blue dextrin method was also used to determine the swelling volume of heated and unheated wheat starch. The results indicated that gel-like character concentrations below close-packing.
Keywords
Wheat Flour, Preheated Wheat Flour, DSC, Gelatinization, Gel
To cite this article
Salah Mohamed Hasan, Agoub Abdella Agoub, Ramadan Elsalhin Abdolgader, Eileen O'Neill, Edwin Morris, Adhesive Interactions between Gelatinised Starch Granules, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2013, pp. 207-212. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20130204.18
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