Core Concepts of Human Rights and Vulnerable Groups in Nutrition Policy of Sudan
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2013, Pages: 352-359
Received: Jan. 8, 2014; Published: Feb. 20, 2014
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Authors
Nafesa Bedri, hfad University for Women, Omdurman, Sudan
Mutamad Amin, hfad University for Women, Omdurman, Sudan
Amani Elkhatim, hfad University for Women, Omdurman, Sudan
Ahmed Gamal Eldin, hfad University for Women, Omdurman, Sudan
Malcolm MacLachlan, Centre for Global Health, School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Hasheem Mannan, Centre for Global Health, School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
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Abstract
To provide equitable health care, and to realize the United Nations’ call for Health for All, health policies have to be committed to core concepts of human rights and be inclusive of vulnerable groups. The aim of this study is to assess the extent to which the Sudan Nutrition Policy addresses core concepts of human rights and the inclusion of vulnerable groups using a novel policy framework (EquiFrame). The overall quality assessment of the policy was Moderate, scoring 67% for vulnerable groups, 57% for core concepts of human rights and 29% for Core Concept Quality. In conclusion, if this policy is to be improved, it is important to integrate the wider notions of human rights within the policy document and link these explicitly to specific and carefully selected vulnerable groups.
Keywords
Health Policy Analysis, Human Rights, Vulnerable Groups
To cite this article
Nafesa Bedri, Mutamad Amin, Amani Elkhatim, Ahmed Gamal Eldin, Malcolm MacLachlan, Hasheem Mannan, Core Concepts of Human Rights and Vulnerable Groups in Nutrition Policy of Sudan, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2013, pp. 352-359. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20130206.24
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