Microbiological Safety of Cooked Vended Foods in an Urban Informal Market: A Case Study of Mbare Msika, Harare, Zimbabwe
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 3, May 2014, Pages: 216-221
Received: Apr. 25, 2014; Accepted: May 13, 2014; Published: May 30, 2014
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Authors
Raphael Kwiri, Food Processing Technology Department, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Belvedere, Box BE 277, Harare, Zimbabwe
Clive Winini, Food Processing Technology Department, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Belvedere, Box BE 277, Harare, Zimbabwe
Jeritah Tongonya, Food Processing Technology Department, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Belvedere, Box BE 277, Harare, Zimbabwe
Wishmore Gwala, Food Processing Technology Department, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Belvedere, Box BE 277, Harare, Zimbabwe
Enock Mpofu, Food Processing Technology Department, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Belvedere, Box BE 277, Harare, Zimbabwe
Felix Mujuru, Food Processing Technology Department, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Belvedere, Box BE 277, Harare, Zimbabwe
Shannon T. Gwala, Food Processing Technology Department, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Belvedere, Box BE 277, Harare, Zimbabwe
Lydia Makarichi, Food Processing Technology Department, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Belvedere, Box BE 277, Harare, Zimbabwe
Perkins Muredzi, Food Processing Technology Department, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Belvedere, Box BE 277, Harare, Zimbabwe
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Abstract
The study presents an investigation of the microbiological safety of cooked vended foods in an urban informal market in Harare, Zimbabwe. Analyses were performed on 200 samples of mostly vended ready to eat foodstuffs (comprising chicken and beef stew, egg rolls, doughnuts and boiled mealie cobs) between the month of October and November 2012. Samples were analyzed against different types of indicator micro-organisms namely total aerobics, coliforms and Escherichia coli and pathogens (Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus). Significantly, early morning samples were less contaminated than afternoon samples (p<0.05). No Salmonella spp. was detected in any of the foodstuffs analysed, though S. aureus and E.coli were present (respectively ranges from 3-62x102 cfu/g and 6-49x101 cfu/g). Respectively, nearly 85.5% and 53% of the samples were highly contaminated with S. aureus and E. coli. Correspondingly, total aerobic plate count ranged from 11-172x103cfu/g, while coliform count ranged from 8-85 x102 cfu/g. Subsequently, the study showed that informally vended foods might contain pathogenic microorganisms which signify a risk for human health. The importance of adequate measures to guarantee food safety was underscored.
Keywords
Indicator Microorganisms, Pathogens, Street Vended Foods, Contamination, Food Safety
To cite this article
Raphael Kwiri, Clive Winini, Jeritah Tongonya, Wishmore Gwala, Enock Mpofu, Felix Mujuru, Shannon T. Gwala, Lydia Makarichi, Perkins Muredzi, Microbiological Safety of Cooked Vended Foods in an Urban Informal Market: A Case Study of Mbare Msika, Harare, Zimbabwe, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2014, pp. 216-221. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140303.24
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