Antimicrobial Substances Production at Refrigeration Temperatures by Lactobacillus delbrueckii MH10: A Candidate for Food Biopreservation
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 3, May 2016, Pages: 179-184
Received: Apr. 2, 2016; Accepted: Apr. 11, 2016; Published: Apr. 26, 2016
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Authors
Hrachya Hovhannisyan, SPC “Armbiotechnology” NAS, Yerevan, Armenia
Alireza Goodarzi, SPC “Armbiotechnology” NAS, Yerevan, Armenia
Andranik Barseghyan, SPC “Armbiotechnology” NAS, Yerevan, Armenia
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Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine formation of antibacterial substances in supernatants of L. delbrueckii during cold storage and evaluate whether the application of this bacteria to raw ground beef would result in significant reductions of E. coli O157:H7 during refrigerated storage. Antibacterial activity of a newly isolated Lactobacillus delbrueckii MH 10 at refrigeration temperatures against food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157: H7 was studied. The size of inhibition zone depends on concentration of LAB cells. The cells (~109 CFU/ml) of L. delbrueckii roduced significant amount of antibacterial substances mainly hydrogen peroxide ~ 35 μg/ml in sodium phosphate buffer (0.2 M, pH 6.5) and ~ 40 μg/ml in beef broth at 5°C during submerged cultivation without of growth. Submerged cocultivation of E. coli O157: H7 with lactobacilli in NB broth at 5°C reducing the total number of the pathogen more than 3 log for 5 days. The cell suspension intendent for treatment must contain 108-9 CFU/ ml of LAB. L. delbrueckii reduced initial amount 2x105/sup> of E. coli O157: H7 in ground beef cocultivation up to 3 log for 3 days and become undetectable after 7 days. The application of L. delbrueckii bacteria does not cause any changes in sensory characteristics of ground beef by itself; moreover promote expanding of shelf-life due to inhibition of psychrophilic spoilage microorganisms.
Keywords
Biopreservation, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Refrigerated Temperatures, Hydrogen Peroxide, E. coli O157: H7
To cite this article
Hrachya Hovhannisyan, Alireza Goodarzi, Andranik Barseghyan, Antimicrobial Substances Production at Refrigeration Temperatures by Lactobacillus delbrueckii MH10: A Candidate for Food Biopreservation, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2016, pp. 179-184. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20160503.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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