Nutrient Composition and Sensory Evaluation of Three Selected Local Dishes Consumed in Ipokia Local Government Area of Ogun State, Nigeria
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 175-180
Received: Jun. 12, 2016; Accepted: Jun. 22, 2016; Published: Jul. 12, 2017
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Authors
Quadri J. A., Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Ogun State College of Health Technology, Ilese- Ijebu, Ogun State, Nigeria
Ojure M. A., Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Ogun State College of Health Technology, Ilese- Ijebu, Ogun State, Nigeria
Edun B. T., Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Ogun State College of Health Technology, Ilese- Ijebu, Ogun State, Nigeria
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Abstract
The study was carried out to determine the nutrient composition and sensory evaluation of three selected local dishes in Ipokia local government area of Ogun state, Nigeria. The recipe of the three dishes was collected from the study area. The ingredients for the dishes were standardized and later the nutrient composition was determined using AOAC (2001) and also sensory evaluation carried on the dishes. The result shows that by simple comparison, Tutu contained more water, followed by the Atomboro then Ata Paki which is fried and therefore contained less moist (mean= 99.19, 97.97, and 97.67). However, the fat content of the Ata Paki was more than Atomboro and Tutu but Atomboro also contain more fat as compared Tutu (mean= 2.04, 1.49 and 0.72), there are more protein in Atomboro, then tutu and Ata Paki, this is possible because of beans content of the dishes. Generally in term of vitamins contents of the dishes, ‘Ata Paki’ contained more vitamins than the other dishes. Though, Atomboro has more vitamins than Tutu. However, there is more vitamin A in Atomboro (0.0975) and Ata Paki (0.0534) whiles more Vitamin B2 in Tutu (0.0744). For the sensory evaluation, the taste, appearance and overall acceptability for “atomboro” was rated 75, 65 and 85 percent while “tutu” rated 60, 80 and 65 percent and “ata-paki” rated 70, 70, 60 percent respectively which shows that “atomboro” is more acceptable as compared to other dishes. The results of the analysis indicated that, despite the acceptability of the dishes, there is insignificant amount of some nutrients that are essential for human health and maintenance. The study concluded that with some nutrients/constituents that are insignificant in the dishes, there is need to improve the dishes by including or improving sources of protein, minerals and fibre like fishes and meats and fruits as an accompaniment with the dishes.
Keywords
Nutrient Composition, Sensory Evaluation, Standardization
To cite this article
Quadri J. A., Ojure M. A., Edun B. T., Nutrient Composition and Sensory Evaluation of Three Selected Local Dishes Consumed in Ipokia Local Government Area of Ogun State, Nigeria, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2017, pp. 175-180. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20170604.15
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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