Consumption Patterns, Processing and Nutritional Value of Traditional Snack “Mugdugu” Consumed in Rural Areas of Burkina Faso
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 6, November 2017, Pages: 237-242
Received: May 12, 2017; Accepted: May 22, 2017; Published: Nov. 17, 2017
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Authors
Fatoumata Hama-Ba, Département Technologie Alimentaire, Institut de Recherche en Sciences Appliquées et Technologies (IRSAT), Centre National de Recherche Scientifique et Technique (CNRST), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Bougouma Boniface, Département Technologie Alimentaire, Institut de Recherche en Sciences Appliquées et Technologies (IRSAT), Centre National de Recherche Scientifique et Technique (CNRST), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Madina Konaté, Département Technologie Alimentaire, Institut de Recherche en Sciences Appliquées et Technologies (IRSAT), Centre National de Recherche Scientifique et Technique (CNRST), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Rasmata Dabo, Département Technologie Alimentaire, Institut de Recherche en Sciences Appliquées et Technologies (IRSAT), Centre National de Recherche Scientifique et Technique (CNRST), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Moussa Moustapha, Institut National de Recherche Agronomique du Niger (INRAN), Niamey, Niger
Brehima Diawara, Département Technologie Alimentaire, Institut de Recherche en Sciences Appliquées et Technologies (IRSAT), Centre National de Recherche Scientifique et Technique (CNRST), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
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Abstract
Traditional African snacks are very little known to the people. The objective of this study is to present the importance of consumption, the process and the nutritional value of a snack traditionally consumed in Burkina Faso. Consumption surveys were conducted among 250 adults in rural and urban areas Lebda and Kaya in the north center area of Burkina Faso. Production follow ups were carried out at the producers in Kaya and Lebda. Carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, iron and zinc contents were determined. Mugdugu is well known to the populations, 97% know it and have used it at least once. Nearly 46% and 20% of respondents in Lebda and Kaya consumed it at least once a week. The market is the main place of supply in the two localities. Mugudugu is consumed by all age, 1 year to more than 45 years. Mugdugu is based on millet (Pennissetum glaucum) and peanut (Arachis hypogea). The process is based on two essentials steps: roasting and grinding. The average contents of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins are respectively 61.78%, 21.67% and 14.45%. Those of iron and zinc are 11.97% and 3.97% respectively. The association of cereal and legume make Mugudugu an interesting snack of good nutritional value that must attract the attention of nutrition actors.
Keywords
Snack, Tradition, Processing, Legumes, Rural
To cite this article
Fatoumata Hama-Ba, Bougouma Boniface, Madina Konaté, Rasmata Dabo, Moussa Moustapha, Brehima Diawara, Consumption Patterns, Processing and Nutritional Value of Traditional Snack “Mugdugu” Consumed in Rural Areas of Burkina Faso, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 6, 2017, pp. 237-242. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20170606.14
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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